Category Archives: Occupational Therapy

Holiday Characters

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For a final theme of the year we chose Holiday Characters—–seen everywhere this time of year! Our sensory groups explored boxes dedicated to different characters. The fine motor groups made character themed ornaments and the language group made a fun holiday themed treat.

 

 

 

 

SENSORY GROUP

Our first box contained a variety of holiday character toys including Nutcrackers, polar bears, SugarPlum fairies, and elves. Some of the toys made noise, either by squeezing or crinkling which added to the fun. The lighted elf wand and Santa hat were big hits—–hohoho.

 

Recognize and respond to different types of sensory stimuli is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

This first box is not exactly a holiday character but since lights are EVERYWHERE this time of year they almost are 🙂

 

 

 

 

Our students always love our light boxes and this colorful one was no exception.

It was very eye catching!

 

 

 

 

 

Recognize a source of light is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

The students had fun making their own Grinch character using green Floam, a plastic Grinch face, and some Mr. Potato head hands. Pretty darn cute!

 

 

 

Recognize one or more external body parts is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

The Coca Cola polar bear is often seen on TV this time of year so we thought a box of Insta Snow was perfect for this character. There was a picture of polar bears to find at the bottom of the box and we put in a spoon, scoop and a little penguin friend for our students to play with. Insta Snow feels cool like the real stuff and was lots of fun to explore.

Solve problems involving quantities of objects or actions using language, such as enough, too much, or more is a math access point that can be addressed here.

 

 

 

 

The Nutcracker ballet is a must see for many people. Our ballet themed winter umbrella was pretty magical, especially when twirled around! Music from the ballet was recorded on a voice output device.

 

 

 

Track objects in motion is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

We made some delicious smelling gingerbread playdough this week. While definitely NOT yummy tasting like real gingerbread, it was still lots of fun to play with using our cute cookie cutter.

 

 

 

Apply a push to move an object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

We found a package of craft foam holiday symbols such as presents, hats, lights, trees in a dollar store and decided they were perfect for water play. The students used a measuring cup and sifter to scoop up and rinse the different shapes. They also adhered to the sides of the tub which was pretty cool!

The science access point match objects by an observable property, such as shape, can be addressed here.

 

 

 

 

Our scent this week was  sugarplum swirl by Bath and BodyWorks. Our students really liked it and left the group smelling like yummy little sugarplums 🙂

 

 

Recognize one or more external body parts is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

FINE MOTOR GROUP

On Tuesday the students made snowflake ornaments.

First, we identified a circle using communication symbols. For our visually impaired students we used textured symbols.

 

 

 

Recognize objects with two-dimensional shapes, such as a circle is a math access point.

 

 

 

Next, they were helped to squeeze a hole puncher, making a CIRCLE shaped hole in the snowflake.

 

 

 

Recognize a change in an object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

Then they glued a CIRCLE shaped photo of themselves onto the snowflake.

Again, recognize objects with two-dimensional shapes is addressed.

 

 

 

 

 

The students helped pull a chenille stem through the small hole.

Recognize that pushing and pulling an object makes it move is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TA DA!!!!

 

 

 

 

 

Sammy and Suzi Snowflakes!

 

 

 

 

On Wednesday the students made gingerbread man ornaments.

First, using communication symbols,  they let us know how many buttons they wanted to put on their gingerbread man.

Associate quantities with number names is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

Next the students used a hole punch to punch a hole in their ornament. Most of the students needed help with this but some of them could do it independently!

 

 

Apply a push to move an object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

Then they glued their faces and buttons onto their ornaments—–great pincer grasp practice!

Match one object to a designated space to show one-to-one correspondence is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The students helped pull a chenille stem through the small hole.

Recognize that pushing and pulling an object makes it move is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TA Da!!!

 

 

 

 

 

Cute little gingerbread people!!!

 

 

 

 

 

LANGUAGE GROUP

Well, the weather turned downright COLD for our language group so maybe hot chocolate would’ve been a better choice, but we went with our Grinch smoothies instead.  Here is the recipe we used: Let’s Make a Grinch Smoothie

We started out by measuring our orange juice.  We talked about how we had to use a measuring cup rather than measuring spoons since we had to measure out 1 cup.  We had a volunteer who poured it into the blender.

Next, we added some spinach.  We need our Grinch smoothie to be GREEN!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Then we got out the frozen mixed fruit.  Everyone had a chance to touch the bag.  They then had to indicate if it felt COLD or HOT.

 

 

 

Recognize an item as warm or cold is a science access point.

 

 

 

We added the frozen fruit to the blender.

Finally, we added some agave nectar.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Since we always taste test the lemon juice when we use it, we decided to taste test the agave.  We think some of our students thought we were trying to trick them with the lemon juice because they were a little hesitant to open their mouths at first 🙂

 

 

We just put a bit on their lips, though, and they could tell that it was sweet.

 

 

 

 

Everyone got a chance to turn on the blender so the ingredients could be mixed up.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We counted out how many students were in the room and poured the Grinch smoothies into our Grinch cups.

Cara traced Grinch faces onto our cups!

 

 

 

 

The students were intrigued once they tasted it they gave it a big thumbs up!

YUM!

 

 

 

What a fun filled week we had! Our very own little holiday characters will be on winter break for a couple of weeks. Join us again in January for more fun and learning——Group by Group.

 Happy Holidays!

Macy’s Thanksgiving Parade

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The Macy’s Thanksgiving parade with all those huge balloons inspired us this week! The sensory groups explored boxes related to some of the different balloon characters. The fine motor groups made paper balloons which the language group used for their own version of Macy’s parade.

It was a really fun week!

 

 

 

 

 

SENSORY GROUP

This box contained a variety of things associated with the parade including some shiny mylar balloons which were very eye catching and also made an intriguing crinkly sound. There were toys that represented some of the different balloons, beads, and a little wooly scarf since it can be pretty chilly in NYC this time of year. The real hit was the My Little Pony mask which the students loved admiring themselves in using the Hello Kitty mirror 🙂

Recognize and respond to different types of sensory stimuli is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

The Sinclair dinosaur is one of the favorite balloons in the parade. Our little dinosaurs roamed around some green and purple rice which when pushed aside revealed a picture of Dino at the bottom of the box.

Also, one of the dinosaurs roared when the button on his tummy was pressed.

Recognize a model of a real object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

There were 3 toy characters to find in the  soft pink sand of this Hello Kitty box. The students really liked watching and feeling the fine sand as it fell through the sifter we also included.

 

The math access point associate quantities with number names can be addressed here.

 

 

 

 

These red, yellow, and white pompoms represented Ronald MacDonald and were perfect for sorting and counting.

 

 

Identify objects by one observable property, such as color, is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

We pulled out some of our colorful glittery and gem filled discovery bottles for our Trolls box. We included a voice output device with their theme song “Can’t stop the feeling” and a little toy Troll to dance along to the music.

 

 

 

The science access point track objects moving up and down can be addressed in this activity.

 

 

 

 

Everybody loves the Pillsbury Dough Boy balloon! We used cloud dough for this box—-of course! It is a little messy but has a very cool texture so totally worth the mess. There was a big scoop and small measuring spoon to let the students practice their scooping skills.

 

Solve problems involving small quantities of objects using language, such as enough, too much, or more is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

Hands were rinsed in Sponge Bob’s lagoon. In addition to a Sponge Bob toy there was a measuring cup and sifter scoop for added fun.

 

 

 

 

Recognize similarities and differences in size of objects is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

Because it had a Thanksgiving vibe, we used Bath and BodyWorks cranberry scented to lotion this week. This had a really strong aroma that was a hit with the students!

 

 

Recognize one or move external body parts is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

FINE MOTOR GROUP 

On Tuesday the students made a paper Dino, the Sinclair dinosaur, balloon.

The students took turns using sponge brushes to paint  our great big balloon.

 

 

 

 

 

Recognize the appearance of an object or material has changed is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

After they were finished painting, the students used communication symbols to identify our paint color—–GREEN!

Identify objects by one observable property, such as color, is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

TA DA!

 

 

 

 

 

 

It’s Dino the Dinosaur!

 

 

 

 

On Wednesday the students divided into 2 tables to paint some more balloons!

First the students identified our paint colors using communication symbols.

Identify objects by one observable property is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

We painted Pikachu yellow………..

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

………..and Hello Kitty pink!

Recognize the appearance of an object has changed is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TA DA!!!!

It’s Pikachu!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TA DA!!!!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

It’s Hello Kitty!

 

 

 

 

 

LANGUAGE GROUP

Since we were talking about a parade this week, we decided to have our OWN parade.  This time, instead of having our students dress up, the adults dressed up!

Thank goodness for adult onesies lol.

The adults represented the different balloons in the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We decorated the students’ wheelchairs with garland and some helium balloons.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Since it was a Thanksgiving parade our turkey led the way!

 

 

 

 

 

Our balloons and costumes were VERY eye catching which made for a pretty exciting parade!

 

 

 

 

 

Since the Macy’s parade ends with Santa, we included him too!

He was pretty popular 🙂

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

After we paraded down the halls of the elementary building, we all had some socialization time while enjoying some snacks.

Each student had to request what they wanted from the snack table.  Sentence strips were presented at each different item.  Students had to point to each symbol in the sentence strip in order to get what they wanted.  Some students required hand-over-hand help to point to each symbol.  Our verbal students had to say what they wanted verbally.

If our students chose ice cream, they would have to request the different toppings that were available, again using the sentence strips provided.  To be polite, we had “thank you” symbols out as well.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Of course, we had our makeshift photo booth so everyone could take festive pictures.

There were also lots of props to add to the fun 🙂

 

 

 

A good time was had by all. Join us again next time for more fun and learning——-

Group by Group!

National Parks

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November 17 is National Take a Hike Day so we decided it would be great time to learn a little more about some of our national parks. Our sensory groups explored boxes related to specific parks. The fine motor groups made art projects featuring things you might see on a hike. The language group made a hike worthy snack!

 

 

 

 

SENSORY GROUP

Our Smokey Mountain National Park box was filled with things you might see while hiking here. There were leaves, pine cones, plastic pine needles, and plush animals including a bird that chirped when squeezed. There were also a pair of binoculars that were a hit.

Match living things with their habitats is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

Volcano National Park in Hawaii has a very unique landscape—-flowing lava! Black kinetic sand moves a lot like lava and with a piece of red plastic at the bottom of the box  we had our own little volcano landscape going!  The students made lava rocks with some blocks from a shape sorter.

The math access point recognize objects with two-dimensional shapes can be addressed here.

 

 

 

 

We thought our pink Floam was the perfect choice for our Grand Canyon box. Since mules are one way people get up and down the canyon we decided to put in some laminated ones of 3 different sizes for the students.

 

 

Recognize similarities and differences in size of objects is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

California has a lot of National Parks including Yosemite. For this box we used our blue and yellow rice which are the state colors. There were letter Y’s, a California magnet, and a picture of Yosemite to find at the bottom of the box. The students were especially intrigued by the magnet!

Recognize two objects that are identical to each other is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

If you want to find some dinosaur fossils, Badlands National Park is the place to go! The students had fun digging for fossils or making their own with the moon sand in this box.

 

 

 

Apply a push to move an object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

We made our Everglades swamp out of green jello and it was a HIT! Some of the students were a little hesitant but others dived right in 🙂 We put in some toy animals like alligators, snakes, lizards, and spiders—–things you might run into while exploring this national park!

 

Match living things to their habitats is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

Yellowstone National Park is known for its geysers like old faithful. When a button was pushed this bath toy sprayed water like geysers———- and produced LOTS of giggles!

 

 

 

Observe and recognize a predictable cause-effect relationship related to a science topic is a science access point.

LOTS AND LOTS AND LOTS OF GIGGLES 🙂

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bath and BodyWorks mahogany woods seemed a perfect scent for this week. The students really responded to its “woodsy” scent.

 

 

 

Recognize one or more external body parts is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

FINE MOTOR GROUP

On Tuesday our students made some black bears, like those you might spot in the Smokey Mountain National Park.

First, we discussed the shape of the day and asked the students to identify it using communication symbols.

Recognize an object with a two dimensional shape is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A black construction paper circle was cut into 2 pieces using adaptive scissors. We used either switch operated or tabletop scissors.

The math access point recognize parts of whole objects can be addressed here.

 

 

 

 

 

Then the 2 semi-circles were glued on to a black paper plate to make the ears.

Associate quantities with number names is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Then a small grey circle nose  was glued down and 2 googlie eyes were added.

 

 

 

 

Recognize when an object is added to a situation is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

TA DA!

 

 

 

 

 

                                                       Let’s go for a hike in the woods!

 

 

 

 

On Wednesday the students made a giant sequoia tree—-like the ones at Grand Sequoia National Park. In our book there is a picture of one with Jeannie’s husband standing under it so be sure to check it out!

First we discussed the color of our paint and identified it using communication symbols. We got 100% right on this one—–our students totally rock!!!!

 

 

 

 

Identify objects by one observable property, such as color, is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

Then each student got a chance to paint some leaves on our tree shape cut from some scrap foam board and its shape cut out by Ms. LaShayla—-one of our wonderful volunteers!

 

 

 

Recognize a change in an object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

We attached the tree top to our trunk made from leftover cardboard and discussed that while we were LITTLE the tree was BIG! Ms. Alexa, another of our wonderful volunteers, cut up a cardboard box to make the tree trunk.

Recognize differences in size of objects is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TA Da…….

we made a Giant Sequoia tree!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LANGUAGE GROUP

We made a protein packed smoothie this week since protein is good for energy which we need while taking a hike!  Here is the recipe we used:  Let_s Make A Peanut Butter Oatmeal Smoothie

We started by putting some vanilla soy milk into the blender.

Recognize when an object is added to a situation is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Next, each of our students got to smell the peanut butter before we put it in the blender.  This was a little confusing to some of students because they were presented with the peanut butter on a spoon 🙂  No one ate it off the spoon, though, so it was a successful smell test!

Recognize and respond to one type of sensory stimuli is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

We put 4 tablespoons of peanut butter into the blender.

Associate quantities with number names is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

After the peanut butter, we put in the frozen bananas.  Each student got to feel the bananas.  We talked about how they were COLD.

Recognize objects as warm or cold is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Finally, we added some old fashioned oats to the blender.

Recognize when an object is added to a situation is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Each of our students got to help blend up the ingredients using a wireless switch that was connected to a power link.  We made sure that it was nice and smooth.

 

 

 

Observe and recognize a predictable cause-effect relationship related to a science topic is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

Time to drink our smoothies!  Now we’re all energized 🙂

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We are glad you joined us this week and hope everyone has a very Happy Thanksgiving! We will be back after the holiday with more fun, learning, and smiles——-

                                                                ——Group by Group!

 

Colonial America

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This week we are looking at life during Colonial times. This theme compliments the Unique Curriculum unit our students are studying this month. Our sensory groups explored boxes related to different aspects of colonial life. The fine motor groups made some colonial themed art projects and the language group made porridge!

 

 

 

 

SENSORY GROUP

We put a lot of different items in this box from farm animals, pictures of historic figures from the time, and even a piece of wood flooring! There was also a discovery bottle with some jacks and dice to represent old time toys. Lots to explore and discover.

Recognize a model of a real object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

A typical breakfast consisted of porridge, which is often made of oatmeal. We haven’t done an oatmeal box in a while so this was the perfect time to bring it out.

The soft oatmeal had a great tactile feel that the students loved as they searched for the letters U-S- A.

 

The science access apply a push to move an object can be addressed here.

 

 

 

 

We found this patriotic pasta on clearance at World Market. The shapes and colors are pretty and perfect for sorting. The box also made a cool noise when shaken. To add to the fun, we put numbers 1 and 3—–for the 13 original colonies!

 

 

The science access point recognize and respond to different types of sensory stimuli can be addressed here.

 

 

 

 

Colonial Americans drank a lot of tea, so we filled this box with tea leaves and a little cup and spoon. There was also a picture of colonial Williamsburg to find at the bottom. The tea had a pretty strong aroma that our students found intriguing and they had lots of fun exploring it.

 

 

Apply a push to move an object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

Puppet shows were a popular form of entertainment back in the day so we thought our students would have fun with this box  of hand puppets. We chose some that represented animals that might be found on colonial farms.

 

 

Recognize one or more external body parts is a science access point that can be addressed here.

They really had a blast with them

—-lots of giggles here 🙂

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For our messy play we went all patriotic—-red and blue glitter in some white oobleck. Total glittery, gooey fun!

 

 

 

 

 

Recognize that pushing and pulling an object makes it move, is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

For our water play we put in a water wheel, which is something that was in use during colonial times. The students were pretty fascinated with it!

 

 

 

 

Recognize one way people use water is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

We used Bath and BodyWorks peach tea scent because tea, apple and peach cider were popular things to drink in colonial america. Everyone loved the peachy scent!

 

 

 

 

Recognize and respond to one type of sensory stimuli is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

FINE MOTOR GROUP

On Tuesday the students made lanterns—-kind of like the ones people used long ago, except ours had battery operated tea lights from Dollar Tree!

We started by identifying the color of our tissue paper using communication symbols, including tactile symbols for our students with visual impairments.

 

Identify objects by one observable property, such as color, is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

The students tore the tissue paper into small pieces. This was a great opportunity to practice bilateral coordination and pre-scissor skills—-and it is totally fun to do 🙂

 

Recognize a change in an object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

Then they put their pieces into a small plastic peanut butter jar.

 

 

 

 

Recognize a movement that reflects a spatial relationship, is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

With the tea light turned on, we closed it up, used chenille stems to make the handle, and…….

 

 

 

TA DA!!!! We made a lantern!

 

 

 

 

 

On Wednesday the students made George Washington puppets using this: George Washington puppet

First we discussed the shape of the paper bag and George’s face.

Recognize an object with two-dimensional shapes is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Then the students used paper cutters and scissors to cut out the  face—-counting the sides, of course!

 

 

 

Recognize the sides of a square is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

The students glued the face and precut hat onto the TOP of a blue paper bag.

 

 

 

 

Recognize a movement that reflects a spatial relationship is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

To finish they pulled apart fiberfil stuffing into TWO pieces and glued it on each side of the face.

Match an object to a designated space to show one-to-one correspondence and associate quantities with number names are math access points.

 

 

 

 

 

TA DA!

 

 

 

 

 

By George, these are some pretty cute puppets!

 

 

 

 

LANGUAGE GROUP

We made some good old fashioned porridge this week in the language group–although we used more advanced technology to heat ours up 🙂

We used this recipe to make our porridge: Let_s Make Colonial Porridge

We started out by measuring the oats using a measuring cup.  Only a little bit at a time was poured in, so our students had to indicate that we needed MORE.  Once we got the correct measurement, we PUT it in a bowl.

Solve problems involving small quantities of objects or actions, using language, such as enough, too much, or more, is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Next, each of our students felt the milk.  They indicated that it felt COLD.  We measured out the milk and POURED it into the bowl.  Then we put it in the microwave to heat it up.

 

 

Recognize objects or materials as warm or cold, is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

While our students waited, they got to play with the oatmeal box from the sensory group.

They seemed to really like the texture!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We had to re-heat the porridge a couple of times, so the students got to pick out their toppings while waiting.  They chose by indicating a picture of what they wanted.  There choices were banana, cinnamon, Greek yogurt, and honey.

Communicate preference for  objects or actions is a language access point.

 

 

 

 

Before the porridge was put in individual bowls, our students got to touch the side of the porridge bowl.  We talked about how it felt WARM.

Recognize objects or materials as warm or cold, is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

We counted out how many bowls we would need.

Associate quantities with number names is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

FINALLY, they got to eat their colonial snack.  YUM!

This was a hit!

 

 

 

 

Thanks again for joining us this week and we also have some exciting news! You may have noticed a new badge on the right side of our page. We were named one of the top 75 Occupational Therapy blogs by Feedspot—–how cool is that!

Join us again next time for more fun and learning——Group by Group!

Day of the Dead

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We had fun learning about Day of the Dead this week. It is a holiday celebrated November 1st and 2nd in Mexico. Our sensory groups explored boxes related to different facts about the holiday. The fine motor groups and language group made art projects inspired by sugar skulls!

 

 

 

 

 

SENSORY GROUP

The students sorted pompoms in the colors of the Mexican flag—–red, green, and white.

 

 

 

Identify objects by one observable property, such as color, is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

These eye catching beans reminded us of all the colorful decorations and costumes seen in pictures of Day of the Dead celebrations.

The students searched for letter D’s of different sizes or watched them sift through fingers.

 

Recognize differences in size of objects is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

This box had different items related to Day of the Dead. We put in some toy people and the word FAMILY since the holiday is all about ancestors. There were also some flower petals, beads, skeletons, and musical instruments—-including a maraca that named colors and numbers in Spanish when shaken!

Recognize a model of a real object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

Salt, representing the “salt of life”, is also a part of the celebration. In this box we put salt and some tools the students could use to explore it. There was also a picture of a calaveras or sugar skull to find underneath.

 

 

Recognize that pushing and pulling an object makes it move, is a science access point. Track objects in motion is another science access point that can be addressed here.

 

 

 

 

Lots of candles are placed on altars during the Day of the Dead. Since we can’t use real candles at school, we used our Wikki Stix and some light toys to simulate them.

The students really had a lot of fun with this box!

 

Some of the students preferred the Wikki Stix…….

but the lighted toys were also a big hit of course!

 

 

 

 

 

Recognize a source of light is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

Colorful flowers are seen everywhere during Day of the Dead celebrations. Our students used a flower shaped cookie cutter with red and yellow play dough to decorate this eye catching sugar skull tray we found at the Dollar General store.

Apply a push to move an object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

There were some fun lighted flowers to look at in our water basin this week. We also included some different sized scoops.

 

 

 

 

Recognize differences in containers that hold liquids is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

Bath and BodyWorks vanilla sugar was the perfect scent for us this week. This sweet scent is always popular with the students—-whether rubbed on hands, arms, or behind ears!

 

Recognize one or more external body parts is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

FINE MOTOR GROUP

On Tuesday the students decorated a sugar skull picture we found on the Coloring Castle website.

We also used some stampers we made using dish scrubbers and craft foam flowers.

 

First the students chose which color paint to start, either RED or YELLOW, using communication symbols.

Identify objects by one observable property, such as color, is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

We applied the paint to the stampers and encouraged the students to stamp UP and DOWN, helping them as needed.

 

 

Recognize a movement that reflects a spatial relationship is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

Ta Da!!!!!

 

 

 

 

                                                         Check out our sugar skulls!

 

 

 

 

 

On Wednesday the students decorated these huge felt sugar skulls we found at the Dollar Tree store. Since they were one dollar a piece it was a little bit of a splurge for us but we couldn’t resist!

First, using communication symbols, the students identified the colors of the glitter we planned to use.

Identify objects by one observable property, such as color, is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Then the students painted their skulls with glue.

Apply a push to move an object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Time to “shake, shake, shake that glitter”!

The science access point recognize an action as fast or slow, can be addressed here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Next they glued some silk flowers onto their skulls. After each flower was glued down we asked the students if they were “all done” or wanted “more”. Of course, we also counted how many flowers each student put on their skull.

 

 

Associate quantities with number names is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

Ta DA!!!!!!

 

 

 

 

 

                                     Such colorful calaveras!

 

 

 

 

 

 

LANGUAGE GROUP

We put our own spin on edible calaveras this week and made our version of sugar skulls.  Here’s the recipe: Lets Make Our Version Of Sugar Skulls

We started out by pouring some milk into a small cup and then made it edible paint by adding food coloring.  Our students got to STIR the food coloring around and watched as it turned our white milk different colors.

Recognize a change in an object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

Once the “paint” was all mixed up, we counted out how many plates and pieces of bread we needed for all of our friends. Each student got to paint a piece of bread, requesting the colors they wanted using communication boards.

Identify objects by one observable property, such as color, is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

After they finished painting their bread, we started to make the face.  We had to count out 2 banana slices for the eyes.  We talked about how the eyes had to go on the TOP of the bread.  Then we counted out 2 blueberries to put on TOP of the banana slices.

 

 

 

 

Next, we added the nose.  Each student got 1 half of a strawberry.  We talked about how the strawberry goes in the MIDDLE of the bread.

Recognize one or more external body parts is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Finally, we used 5 miniature marshmallows for the teeth.  Students had to indicate that they needed MORE marshmallows if they did not receive the correct amount.  We talked about how the marshmallows go on the BOTTOM of the bread.

Associate quantities with number names and identify spatial relationships, are both math access points.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wow!!  These turned out great and were lots of fun to make.

                     Pretty tasty too!

 

 

 

We enjoyed learning about Dia de los Muertos this week and hope you did too.

Join us again next time for more fun and learning——Group by Group!

Monsters in Movies

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We had so much fun with this unit! Our book is awesome and the students had a great time dressing up as different characters so be sure to check it out. Our sensory groups explored boxes related to different movie monsters. The fine motor groups made some monster art projects and the language group conducted some monster experiments!

 

 

 

 

SENSORY GROUP

To set the mood, we turned off the lights and brought out our Hotel Transylvania umbrella. It had orange lights, ghostly garland, and some little bats. The students loved it!

 

 

 

The science access point recognize a model of a real object can be addressed here

 

 

 

 

We filled this “monster” box of black and red paper shred with figures, finger puppets, a plush Scooby Doo, and a great BIG squeaky rat! The students rocked out to The Monster Mash recorded on a voice output device. Lots of things to look at, touch, listen to, and explore!

 

Recognize and respond to different types of sensory stimuli is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

For our Frankenstein box we used green Floam and then added Mr. Potato Head pieces and some laminated props we made. The students came up with some monstrously  cool creations!

 

Recognize one or more external body parts is a science access point that can be addressed here.

 

 

 

 

Bubber is a great molding substance, perfect for making Scooby snacks! The students could use the bone shaped cookie cutter or just mold the Bubber into whatever shapes they liked.

 

 

 

Apply a push to move an object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

The character Mal, from The Descendants, has purple hair. We decided our purple kinetic sand would be PERFECT for this box. We included a heart shaped scoop that could be used for a mold and a little rake. Whether pushing and pulling to make it move or just watching it drip back down into the box—–this stuff is always a favorite!Recognize that pushing and pulling an object makes it move is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

The students used pieces cut from black craft foam to turn shaving foam into ghosts. Messy fun as usual.

 

 

 

 

Track the movement of objects that are pushed or pulled is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

Our caribbean pirate lagoon contained a shipwreck and a couple of ducky pirates. There were also 2 different size scoops for added fun.

 

 

 

Recognize differences in sizes of containers that hold liquids is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

We thought that Bath and BodyWorks twilight woods scent would be the perfect complement to our unit this week. They really loved the scent!

 

 

 

Recognize and respond to one type of sensory stimuli is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

FINE MOTOR GROUP

On Tuesday the students made some monster masks using this: monster mask

We asked the students to choose which marker they wanted to use first. We took a cue from the colors of Sully from Monsters Inc. and used the colors BLUE and PURPLE.

Identify objects by one observable property, such as color, is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

Some of our students used the writer we made using a switch operated vibrating toy, others decorated their masks old school—-with markers 🙂

 

 

 

Recognize a change in an object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

TA DA!

 

 

 

 

 

                                                      Such cute little monsters!

 

 

 

 

 

On Wednesday we made some paper bag mummies! We found the idea on Pinterest.

First the students identified the color of our marker using communication symbols.

Match objects by one observable property, such as color, is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We asked the students to use their black markers to draw ACROSS lines on the bag. Then they glued a strip of torn black paper at the TOP of the bag.

Recognize a movement that reflects a spatial relationship, is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

Next we squeezed 2 glue dots on the black piece of paper and asked the students to put a googlie eye on each dot.

Associate quantities with number names is a math access point. Match one object to a designated space to show one-to-one correspondence is also a math access point.

 

 

 

 

Ta DA!!!

 

 

 

 

 

                                                    It’s a Mummy Monster Mash!

 

 

 

 

 

LANGUAGE GROUP

This week, instead of making yummy treats, we put together some pretty awesome monster experiments.  Here are the ones that we used with the directions: Let_s Do Monster Experiments!

Since the pumpkin was cut beforehand, we had the innards of the pumpkin in a bag.  We passed it around so our students could feel what the insides of pumpkins are like. Since it had been in the fridge it also felt COLD.

Recognize objects or materials as warm or cold, is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

We started out by making an Erupting Pumpkin.  First, we put some baking soda in a small bowl.

Next, we added some dish soap to the bowl.

Recognize when an object is added to a situation, is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

Our students voted between 2 different colors of food coloring.  The choice was a tie, so Grandma had to break it by voting for PINK.  We added the food coloring and some glitter.

Compare quantities to 3 using language, such as more, less, or the same, is math access point. Communicate preference for familiar objects or actions is a language access point.

 

 

 

 

 

We put the bowl in a carved out pumpkin (thank you to Cara’s son and daughter for creating the faces for the pumpkin).  We poured some vinegar in it and watched it erupt!

WAY COOL!!!!!

 

 

 

 

 

For our next experiment, we made some Monster Slime.

We started by putting 1/2 cup of glue in a bowl.  Then we added 1/2 cup of water to the glue.

We put in some slimy green food coloring and, of course, some glitter!  We made sure to stir it up really well.  We talked about how it was thin and watery.

Solve simple problems involving joining small quantities of objects is a math access point

 

 

 

 

 

Then we added the liquid starch.  When we began stirring it around, it almost instantly started firming up.  We transferred it to a plate so the students could see how it changed to a solid.

 

 

Recognize a change in an object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

We added some googly eyes and voila!  Monster slime!

 

 

 

 

There were mixed reactions about it all around 🙂

 

 

 

 

 

Last, we made an Expanding Ghost.

We put some vinegar into an empty water bottle.  Then we put some baking soda into a balloon that had a ghost face on it.

Again, the math access point recognize when an object is added to a situation, is addressed.

 

 

 

 

We secured the balloon over the top of the bottle and then turned the balloon over so that the baking soda fell into the bottle.

WOW!!  The balloon got bigger as the reaction happened in the bottle.  Our students also got to feel the bottle which was COLD from the reaction.

So much spooky fun!

 

 

 

We had a MONSTER good time this week! Join us again next time for more fun and learning——-Group by Group!

 

Fall Festival

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It is that time of year when the leaves start changing color and the days are cooler—-everywhere else but here lol. Despite the fact that it still feels like summer, our school had a fabulous fall festival and we are using it as our theme this week. The sensory groups explored lots colorful boxes. The fine motor groups made some leafy crafts and the language group led a costume parade inviting all their elementary friends to a mini fall festival.

 

 

 

 

SENSORY GROUP

We filled this box with items associated with fall and things you might see at a fall festival such as silk fall leaves, pumpkins, play food, and scarecrows. We even included a little tractor to pull a hay ride!

 

 

Recognize a model of a real object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

There was a chili cook-off at our festival and since chili usually contains beans, we brought out our dried mixed beans for this box.

We added some Bingo Game numbers for the students to find.

 

Associate quantities with number names is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

This orange rice with black beans was also a perfect box for this unit. The students searched for letter F’s and there was a colorful fall picture to find at the bottom of the box.

 

 

Recognize objects that are identical to each other is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

Instead of 1 color of play dough, this week we had 2! The students had fun using a leaf shaped cookie cutter to cut out yellow and red leaves. When mixed together we even get a third color—-orange!

 

 

Apply a push to move an object is science access point.

 

 

 

 

This fall umbrella is one of our favorites. The yellow umbrella with the colorful craft foam and silk leaves was very eye catching and a big hit with the students. To add to the fun we included some eye-catching bubbles—-just like the bubbles we had at our festival!

 

Track objects in motion is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

There are always lots of yummy treats to be had at a fall festival. To represent all the yumminess, we made some chocolate cloud dough. Fun for molding or scooping, the students had a blast!

 

 

Recognize that pushing and pulling an object makes it move, is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

The students used a sieve to scoop up craft foam leaves or a little orange dish scrubber floating in the water.

 

 

 

Match objects by one observable property, such as shape, is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

Bath and BodyWorks made the perfect scent for this week—–pumpkin pie paradise! A yummy scent that left our students smelling delicious 🙂

 

 

Recognize one or more external body parts is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

FINE MOTOR GROUP

On Tuesday we made a fall collage.

First, we identified the color of our fall leaves using communication symbols.

Identify objects by one observable property, such as color, is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

Then we made some branches and twigs using brown markers. Some of the students used one of our switch operated writers we made using a switch toy and some velcro.

 

Apply a push to move an object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

After they finished drawing, the students glued some leaves onto their branches. They also glued on a little scarecrow that they colored earlier in the day.

 

 

Recognize a movement that reflects a spatial relationship, such as up and down, is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

TA DA!

We are having some fall fun!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On Wednesday we made a tree with colorful fall leaves using this:tree template

The students identified the color of the leaves and the shape of our paper using communication symbols.

 

 

 

Match objects by one observable property such, such as color, is a science access point. Recognize objects with two-dimensional shapes, such as circle or square, is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

We used a crayon resist technique by painting watered down orange paint over brown crayon.

Recognize that pushing and pulling an object makes it move is a science access point.

Then the students placed a paper towel on top to soak up the extra paint.

Recognize a change in an object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

Next, they glued some colorful silk leaves on to their trees.

Recognize when an object is added to a situation is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TaDa!

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                                                   Happy Fall Ya’ll!

 

 

 

 

 

LANGUAGE GROUP

This week our students led their friends on a costume parade around the elementary building to the multi-use room we had set up for a fall festival.

First everyone had to pick our their costumes. Ms. Robin’s class decided on a pirates theme!

 

 

 

 

Adjust body movement or nonverbal expression with prompting as necessary to communicate wants and needs, is a language access point.

 

 

 

 

The students were pretty pleased with their selections and we think they looked pretty grrrrrreat!

 

 

 

 

 

                                                                   Ahoy mateys!

 

 

 

 

 

The students set sail, inviting all their friends to join the fun!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other classes dressed up too—–we had some dwarves, good witches, and……..

 

 

 

 

                                                      ……….a pack of dalmatians!

 

 

 

 

 

We recently got this really cool wheelchair tunnel which we brought out for the first time! To give it a kind of “fun house” feel, we attached a rope light to the top—–very eye catching to our students.

We talked about going IN the tunnel and coming OUT of the tunnel.

                                                               This was a hit!!!

 

 

 

 

 

It wouldn’t be a fall festival without some yummy treats!

 

 

 

 

 

To tell us what they wanted, our students used communication symbols.   They formed sentences by indicating “I want ___ please” .    There was a communication strip at each different food or drink so that they could request what they wanted.  Adults helped, as needed, pointing to the symbols to model the use of them or providing hand over had help for those who need a bit more assistance.

 

 

 

 

 

The photo booth was a hit!

 

 

 

 

 

Our little pirates sure put on a fabulous fall festival!

It was a wonderful time to socialize and practice our communication skills!  The costumes were a major perk 🙂

 

 

 

 

We had such a fun week! Join us next time for more fun and learning——Group by Group!