Category Archives: Speech Therapy

Holiday Characters book

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We are in the holiday spirit this week (let’s be honest…this MONTH) and we are talking all about the different holiday characters that we see around this time of year.  This is a special book because it features a one-of-a-kind background created by our art teacher, Judy, and her students.  It also features our students on each page dressed up as popular holiday characters, from Frosty the Snowman to Suzy Snowflake.  Take a look at the book to get into the holiday spirit with us!

 

 

 

Here is a link to the book: What Holiday Characters Do You See?

Macy’s Thanksgiving Parade book

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Although it’s a week after Thanksgiving, we are still in the Thanksgiving mood!  We are talking all about the Macy’s Thanksgiving Parade.  There are all sorts of balloons that can be seen during the parade.  Our book covers a few of them, like Ronald McDonald, Trolls, and Hello Kitty.  We have a couple of our students attending the parade who are featured on the front and the back.  See what other balloons were at the parade!

 

 

 

Here is a link to the book: At The Macy_s Thanksgiving Parade

National Parks Book

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We are celebrating National Hiking Day (November 17) by talking about some of the national parks that we have here in the United States.  We journeyed all across the nation, from the Everglades in Florida to the Smoky Mountains in Colorado to Volcanoes National Park in Hawaii.  There are so many beautiful places to go for a hike!  We have a couple of our students “taking a hike” on the front cover and on the “the end” pages of the book.  A big THANK YOU to Jeannie for providing us with the Sequoia National Park pictures and to Leisa for the Grand Canyon picture.  We hope you enjoy!

 

 

 

 

Here is a link to the book: Let_s Take A Hike

National Parks

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November 17 is National Take a Hike Day so we decided it would be great time to learn a little more about some of our national parks. Our sensory groups explored boxes related to specific parks. The fine motor groups made art projects featuring things you might see on a hike. The language group made a hike worthy snack!

 

 

 

 

SENSORY GROUP

Our Smokey Mountain National Park box was filled with things you might see while hiking here. There were leaves, pine cones, plastic pine needles, and plush animals including a bird that chirped when squeezed. There were also a pair of binoculars that were a hit.

Match living things with their habitats is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

Volcano National Park in Hawaii has a very unique landscape—-flowing lava! Black kinetic sand moves a lot like lava and with a piece of red plastic at the bottom of the box  we had our own little volcano landscape going!  The students made lava rocks with some blocks from a shape sorter.

The math access point recognize objects with two-dimensional shapes can be addressed here.

 

 

 

 

We thought our pink Floam was the perfect choice for our Grand Canyon box. Since mules are one way people get up and down the canyon we decided to put in some laminated ones of 3 different sizes for the students.

 

 

Recognize similarities and differences in size of objects is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

California has a lot of National Parks including Yosemite. For this box we used our blue and yellow rice which are the state colors. There were letter Y’s, a California magnet, and a picture of Yosemite to find at the bottom of the box. The students were especially intrigued by the magnet!

Recognize two objects that are identical to each other is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

If you want to find some dinosaur fossils, Badlands National Park is the place to go! The students had fun digging for fossils or making their own with the moon sand in this box.

 

 

 

Apply a push to move an object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

We made our Everglades swamp out of green jello and it was a HIT! Some of the students were a little hesitant but others dived right in 🙂 We put in some toy animals like alligators, snakes, lizards, and spiders—–things you might run into while exploring this national park!

 

Match living things to their habitats is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

Yellowstone National Park is known for its geysers like old faithful. When a button was pushed this bath toy sprayed water like geysers———- and produced LOTS of giggles!

 

 

 

Observe and recognize a predictable cause-effect relationship related to a science topic is a science access point.

LOTS AND LOTS AND LOTS OF GIGGLES 🙂

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bath and BodyWorks mahogany woods seemed a perfect scent for this week. The students really responded to its “woodsy” scent.

 

 

 

Recognize one or more external body parts is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

FINE MOTOR GROUP

On Tuesday our students made some black bears, like those you might spot in the Smokey Mountain National Park.

First, we discussed the shape of the day and asked the students to identify it using communication symbols.

Recognize an object with a two dimensional shape is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A black construction paper circle was cut into 2 pieces using adaptive scissors. We used either switch operated or tabletop scissors.

The math access point recognize parts of whole objects can be addressed here.

 

 

 

 

 

Then the 2 semi-circles were glued on to a black paper plate to make the ears.

Associate quantities with number names is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Then a small grey circle nose  was glued down and 2 googlie eyes were added.

 

 

 

 

Recognize when an object is added to a situation is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

TA DA!

 

 

 

 

 

                                                       Let’s go for a hike in the woods!

 

 

 

 

On Wednesday the students made a giant sequoia tree—-like the ones at Grand Sequoia National Park. In our book there is a picture of one with Jeannie’s husband standing under it so be sure to check it out!

First we discussed the color of our paint and identified it using communication symbols. We got 100% right on this one—–our students totally rock!!!!

 

 

 

 

Identify objects by one observable property, such as color, is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

Then each student got a chance to paint some leaves on our tree shape cut from some scrap foam board and its shape cut out by Ms. LaShayla—-one of our wonderful volunteers!

 

 

 

Recognize a change in an object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

We attached the tree top to our trunk made from leftover cardboard and discussed that while we were LITTLE the tree was BIG! Ms. Alexa, another of our wonderful volunteers, cut up a cardboard box to make the tree trunk.

Recognize differences in size of objects is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TA Da…….

we made a Giant Sequoia tree!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LANGUAGE GROUP

We made a protein packed smoothie this week since protein is good for energy which we need while taking a hike!  Here is the recipe we used:  Let_s Make A Peanut Butter Oatmeal Smoothie

We started by putting some vanilla soy milk into the blender.

Recognize when an object is added to a situation is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Next, each of our students got to smell the peanut butter before we put it in the blender.  This was a little confusing to some of students because they were presented with the peanut butter on a spoon 🙂  No one ate it off the spoon, though, so it was a successful smell test!

Recognize and respond to one type of sensory stimuli is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

We put 4 tablespoons of peanut butter into the blender.

Associate quantities with number names is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

After the peanut butter, we put in the frozen bananas.  Each student got to feel the bananas.  We talked about how they were COLD.

Recognize objects as warm or cold is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Finally, we added some old fashioned oats to the blender.

Recognize when an object is added to a situation is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Each of our students got to help blend up the ingredients using a wireless switch that was connected to a power link.  We made sure that it was nice and smooth.

 

 

 

Observe and recognize a predictable cause-effect relationship related to a science topic is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

Time to drink our smoothies!  Now we’re all energized 🙂

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We are glad you joined us this week and hope everyone has a very Happy Thanksgiving! We will be back after the holiday with more fun, learning, and smiles——-

                                                                ——Group by Group!

 

Colonial America book

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This week, we are using the Unique theme to talk about Colonial America.  Times were much different back then!  Our book talks about some different jobs they had, food they ate, and games they played.  We have a few of our students dressed up in some of the clothing that people during that time period would wear.  Look and see how much has changed!

 

 

 

 

 

Here is a link to the book: What Was Colonial America Like?

Colonial America

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This week we are looking at life during Colonial times. This theme compliments the Unique Curriculum unit our students are studying this month. Our sensory groups explored boxes related to different aspects of colonial life. The fine motor groups made some colonial themed art projects and the language group made porridge!

 

 

 

 

SENSORY GROUP

We put a lot of different items in this box from farm animals, pictures of historic figures from the time, and even a piece of wood flooring! There was also a discovery bottle with some jacks and dice to represent old time toys. Lots to explore and discover.

Recognize a model of a real object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

A typical breakfast consisted of porridge, which is often made of oatmeal. We haven’t done an oatmeal box in a while so this was the perfect time to bring it out.

The soft oatmeal had a great tactile feel that the students loved as they searched for the letters U-S- A.

 

The science access apply a push to move an object can be addressed here.

 

 

 

 

We found this patriotic pasta on clearance at World Market. The shapes and colors are pretty and perfect for sorting. The box also made a cool noise when shaken. To add to the fun, we put numbers 1 and 3—–for the 13 original colonies!

 

 

The science access point recognize and respond to different types of sensory stimuli can be addressed here.

 

 

 

 

Colonial Americans drank a lot of tea, so we filled this box with tea leaves and a little cup and spoon. There was also a picture of colonial Williamsburg to find at the bottom. The tea had a pretty strong aroma that our students found intriguing and they had lots of fun exploring it.

 

 

Apply a push to move an object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

Puppet shows were a popular form of entertainment back in the day so we thought our students would have fun with this box  of hand puppets. We chose some that represented animals that might be found on colonial farms.

 

 

Recognize one or more external body parts is a science access point that can be addressed here.

They really had a blast with them

—-lots of giggles here 🙂

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For our messy play we went all patriotic—-red and blue glitter in some white oobleck. Total glittery, gooey fun!

 

 

 

 

 

Recognize that pushing and pulling an object makes it move, is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

For our water play we put in a water wheel, which is something that was in use during colonial times. The students were pretty fascinated with it!

 

 

 

 

Recognize one way people use water is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

We used Bath and BodyWorks peach tea scent because tea, apple and peach cider were popular things to drink in colonial america. Everyone loved the peachy scent!

 

 

 

 

Recognize and respond to one type of sensory stimuli is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

FINE MOTOR GROUP

On Tuesday the students made lanterns—-kind of like the ones people used long ago, except ours had battery operated tea lights from Dollar Tree!

We started by identifying the color of our tissue paper using communication symbols, including tactile symbols for our students with visual impairments.

 

Identify objects by one observable property, such as color, is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

The students tore the tissue paper into small pieces. This was a great opportunity to practice bilateral coordination and pre-scissor skills—-and it is totally fun to do 🙂

 

Recognize a change in an object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

Then they put their pieces into a small plastic peanut butter jar.

 

 

 

 

Recognize a movement that reflects a spatial relationship, is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

With the tea light turned on, we closed it up, used chenille stems to make the handle, and…….

 

 

 

TA DA!!!! We made a lantern!

 

 

 

 

 

On Wednesday the students made George Washington puppets using this: George Washington puppet

First we discussed the shape of the paper bag and George’s face.

Recognize an object with two-dimensional shapes is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Then the students used paper cutters and scissors to cut out the  face—-counting the sides, of course!

 

 

 

Recognize the sides of a square is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

The students glued the face and precut hat onto the TOP of a blue paper bag.

 

 

 

 

Recognize a movement that reflects a spatial relationship is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

To finish they pulled apart fiberfil stuffing into TWO pieces and glued it on each side of the face.

Match an object to a designated space to show one-to-one correspondence and associate quantities with number names are math access points.

 

 

 

 

 

TA DA!

 

 

 

 

 

By George, these are some pretty cute puppets!

 

 

 

 

LANGUAGE GROUP

We made some good old fashioned porridge this week in the language group–although we used more advanced technology to heat ours up 🙂

We used this recipe to make our porridge: Let_s Make Colonial Porridge

We started out by measuring the oats using a measuring cup.  Only a little bit at a time was poured in, so our students had to indicate that we needed MORE.  Once we got the correct measurement, we PUT it in a bowl.

Solve problems involving small quantities of objects or actions, using language, such as enough, too much, or more, is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Next, each of our students felt the milk.  They indicated that it felt COLD.  We measured out the milk and POURED it into the bowl.  Then we put it in the microwave to heat it up.

 

 

Recognize objects or materials as warm or cold, is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

While our students waited, they got to play with the oatmeal box from the sensory group.

They seemed to really like the texture!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We had to re-heat the porridge a couple of times, so the students got to pick out their toppings while waiting.  They chose by indicating a picture of what they wanted.  There choices were banana, cinnamon, Greek yogurt, and honey.

Communicate preference for  objects or actions is a language access point.

 

 

 

 

Before the porridge was put in individual bowls, our students got to touch the side of the porridge bowl.  We talked about how it felt WARM.

Recognize objects or materials as warm or cold, is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

We counted out how many bowls we would need.

Associate quantities with number names is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

FINALLY, they got to eat their colonial snack.  YUM!

This was a hit!

 

 

 

 

Thanks again for joining us this week and we also have some exciting news! You may have noticed a new badge on the right side of our page. We were named one of the top 75 Occupational Therapy blogs by Feedspot—–how cool is that!

Join us again next time for more fun and learning——Group by Group!

Day of the Dead book

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We’re celebrating Day of the Dead this week in our groups.  We learned a lot about this Mexican holiday!  We learned that it is a time to celebrate and remember those loved ones who have died.  We also read about some of the things that are put out on the altars that are created for the loved ones.  Two of our own students got into the spirit of Day of the Dead by dressing up in costumes that might be seen during the Day of the Dead.  Read our book to find out about it!

 

 

 

 

Here is the link to the book: We Celebrate Day Of The Dead