We Love Eric Carle book

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March 20th is the Very Hungry Caterpillar day, so we decided to dedicate this week’s theme to the author, Eric Carle.  He has written so many wonderful books and our book takes a look at quite a few of them.   We have our students dressed up as different characters from the different books.  Some of the books that we take a look at are the Very Hungry Caterpillar (of course!), Brown Bear, Brown Bear, and The Tiny Seed.

There are even some books that we never heard of until we started researching Eric Carle!  Our incredible art teacher, Ms. Judy, had some of her students help create the background of our book and we think it’s pretty fantastic.  Take a look and see some of the different books by Eric Carle!

 

 

 

 

Here is a link to the book: Let_s Read Books By Eric Carle

We Love Eric Carle

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March 20 is Very Hungry Caterpillar Day so this week we are celebrating Eric Carle! Our sensory groups explored boxes related to some of his books. The fine motor groups made some very hungry caterpillars, and the language group made a tasty treat inspired by one of Eric Carle’s characters.

 

 

 

 

 

SENSORY GROUP

This box was filled with a variety of items related to some of the characters found in the books such as a plush brown bear, caterpillar, a firefly, dragon, play food, and some board books.

 

 

 

There were lots of things to discover and explore.

The squeaky cupcake turned out to be especially popular!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recognize a model of a real object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

There was a picture of planet earth, a rooster, and two different sized scoops in our “Rooster sees the world” rice box. The rice was eye catching and made for lots of scooping fun!

 

 

 

 

The math access point solve problems involving small quantities of objects or actions using language, such as enough, too much, or more, can be addressed here.

 

 

 

 

The students sorted green pasta caterpillars and red pasta butterflies in “The Very Hungry Caterpillar” box.

 

 

 

 

Match objects by one observable property, such as color, is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

We laminated some flowers from Eric Carle’s books and put them into our Tiny Seed box filled with birdseed. The flowers made the box very eye catching and the students loved the way the seeds felt on their hands! We also included a letter F to find.

 

Recognize and respond to different types of sensory stimuli.

 

 

 

 

Our “Grouchy Ladybug” pillow vibrated when squeezed and was a huge hit—–the students loved it!

 

 

 

 

Apply a push to move an object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

For “The Little Cloud” box we made cloud dough, of course! Since the book’s illustration featured a face, we put in some Mr. Potato Head pieces for the students to play with.

 

 

 

The science access point recognize one or more external body parts can be addressed here.

 

 

 

 

There were 10 Little Ducks in our water pond this week. Some of them squeaked which added to the fun!

 

 

 

 

Associate quantities with number names is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

Since a very hungry caterpillar might want to snack on some leaves, we chose Bath and Body Works rain kissed leaves as our scent this week. The students really liked its light aroma.

 

 

Recognize and respond to one type of sensory stimuli is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

FINE MOTOR GROUP

On Tuesday we used an idea from Pinterest to make our hungry caterpillar.

First the students identified the color GREEN using communication symbols.

 

 

 

 

Identify objects by one observable property, such as color, is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

Then the students painted their paper plate crescent.

 

 

 

 

 

Recognize that pushing and pulling an object makes it move, is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

They added a cute caterpillar face (pre-made by our wonderful volunteers).

Recognize a change in an object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TA DA!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                                              Some very hungry caterpillars!

 

 

 

 

On Wednesday the students made caterpillars out of paper plates we got a Dollar Tree—can’t beat the price!

First, we discussed the shape of our plates and had the students identify a circle using communication symbols.

Recognize objects with two-dimensional shapes, such as a circle is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

The students used a circle punch to cut two red circles. They also identified the number 2 using communication symbols.

 

 

 

Associate quantities with number names is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

Then they glued the red circles on to some pre-cut yellow circles to make caterpillar eyes. We also asked the students to identify which circle was BIG and which was LITTLE.

 

 

 

Recognize differences in size of objects is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

After the students glued the eyes onto a red paper plate, they chose how many green plates they wanted to add to make their caterpillar bodies. They could add 1, 2, or 3!

Everything got stapled together!

 

Recognize when an object is added to a situation is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

TA DA!

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                                            More very hungry caterpillars!!!

 

 

 

 

LANGUAGE GROUP

This week, our language group made a snack that could be taken from the Eric Carle book, Walter the Baker.  In the book, Walter creates pretzels.  For our group, since making pretzels takes a lot of time, we decided to make a dipping sauce for some frozen pretzels.  Here is the recipe that we used: Let_s Make Pretzels and Dipping Sauce

While reading the book, our students had to locate the symbol TURN on their communication boards each time it was time to turn the page for the recipe.

We started out by putting some cream cheese into a bowl.  Our students indicated on their communication boards where the picture of the bowl was.  They also had to locate the word PUT on their communication boards.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Next, we added some butter.  Each student had to indicate the measuring spoon when compared to the measuring cup.  To help them out, we reminded them that the measuring spoon is smaller than the measuring cup.

Recognize differences in sizes of containers that hold liquids is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

Our students helped activate the switch to turn on the mixer and we mixed up the ingredients until they were smooth.  They had to locate MORE to indicate that we needed to mix it up more.  They located DONE when we were finished mixing.

Solve problems involving small quantities of objects or actions using language, such as enough, too much, or more is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

Next, we added some powdered sugar.  Again, we had our students indicate what we would use to measure out a cup of powdered sugar: the measuring cup or measuring spoon.  We verbally prompted that we would need something BIG to use.

 

 

Again, the math access point recognize differences in sizes of containers that hold liquids, is addressed.

 

 

 

 

We added some vanilla extract to the mix.  Before we did, though, each student got to smell it.  We had some head turners who didn’t like the smell, but overall they liked it.

Recognize and respond to one type of sensory stimuli is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

After we mixed that all together we added the heavy cream and mixed again until smooth.

 

 

 

 

Recognize a change in an object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

While we were mixing, we put some frozen pretzel bites into the microwave to warm them up.

After everything was finished, our students got to enjoy some pretzels with dipping sauce once they indicated WANT on their communication boards!  It wasn’t too sweet either.

 

                                                                            Very yummy 🙂

 

 

 

We really enjoyed this week and hope you did too. Join us next time for more fun and learning—-Group by Group!

 

Women’s History Month book

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March is Women’s History Month so we are celebrating women!  In the book, we have some famous women and a fact about each as to why they are famous.  We have an astronaut, a First Lady, and 2 different Olympics athletes to name a few.  We also have one of our own students dressed as Rosie the Riveter on the front cover.  On the back we feature the elementary teachers and instructional aids who help out at school each day and, in our opinion, should be recognized as important women in history as well as in the present!  Take a look and find out a little bit about some of America’s women in history.

 

 

 

Here is a link to the book: We Celebrate Women_s History Month

Women’s History Month

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March is Women’s history month and March 8 was International Women’s Day so this week we chose to learn a little bit about some women who have made history. The sensory group boxes, fine motor group art projects, and the language group’s healthy snack, are all related to women featured in our book!

We had fun and learned a lot!

 

 

 

SENSORY GROUP

Ellen Ochoa is the first female Hispanic astronaut! This space themed box was filled with some “outer space” black beans. We added a little astronaut and some stars to find.

 

 

 

 

Recognize a space related object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

Muriel Siebert was the first women to be on the New York Stock Exchange. There were all sorts of money related items in this box including some play money, a coin filled discovery bottle, and a wallet. They really had fun with this box!

 

 

The social studies access point identify coins as money that can be used to buy things can be addressed here.

 

 

 

 

Oprah is a multimedia giant—-actor, producer, talk show host, and philanthropist! One of her best known roles was in the movie The Color Purple so we chose purple kinetic sand and a letter O stamp for her box.

 

 

 

Apply a push to move an object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

Misty Copeland is the first African American woman promoted to principal dancer at the American Ballet Theater. Her box is filled with swatches of tulle and satin, some ballet shoes, and a tiara.

 

 

Recognize and respond to different types of sensory stimuli is a science access point.

We also put in a stretchy tutu that doubled as a very fun hat 🙂

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Beyonce is one of the most well known singer/songwriters of today! We recorded one of her songs on a voice output device then put in some musical instruments so our students could play along.

 

 

Recognize objects that create sounds is a science access point.

We also included some cool sunglasses——-

 

 

 

 

——–which our students totally rocked of course!

 

 

 

 

We recently watched Chloe Kim become the youngest woman to win an Olympic gold medal in the half pipe snowboarding event! We thought she was amazing!! The students had fun making their own “snowboard” trails through our shaving cream “snow”.

 

 

Recognize that pushing and pulling an object makes it move is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

Natalie Coughlin is a swimmer who has won 12 Olympic medals and was the first ever woman to swim the 100 meter backstroke in less than a minute—-how cool is that! There were foam numbers 1 0 0 to scoop out of the water this week.

The math access point associate quantities with number names can be addressed here.

 

 

 

 

Our fruity raspberry scent from Bath and Body Works reminded us of farm to table item that Alice Waters might serve at her restaurant. The aroma was sweet—-just like our students 🙂

 

 

 

 

Recognize one or more external body parts is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

FINE MOTOR GROUP

On Tuesday as another nod to Alice Waters, we chose some healthy apples to PAINT with rather than eat this week!

First our students identified the shape of the paper we were using and then it’s color. They also identified the color of our paint.

 

 

 

 

Identify objects by one observable property, such as color is a science access point. Recognize an object with a two-dimensional shape is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

To make it easier for our students to hold the apple we inserted a fork into it then we asked the students to stamp UP and DOWN.

 

 

 

 

Recognize a movement that reflects a spatial relationship, such as up and down is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

TA DA!

 

 

 

 

 

 

We are celebrating Women’s History Month!

 

 

 

 

On Wednesday we made some scales—-like those that represent the Supreme Court Judge Sandra Day O’Conner!

First the students identified the shape of the our kleenex boxes.

 

 

 

 

 

Recognize and object with a two-dimensional shape is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

Then the students used colorful markers to decorate their boxes.

 

 

 

 

The science access points recognize a change in an object and recognize that pushing and pulling an object makes it move, both can be addressed here.

 

 

 

 

Our scales (made from some cut up cereal boxes, paper plates, and yarn by our wonderful volunteers) were attached with brads by the adults then we got to try them out! The students were pretty fascinated with seeing how their scales worked!

The math access point describe objects in terms of measurable attributes (longer, shorted, heavier, lighter, etc.) is addressed here.

 

 

 

 

TA DA!

 

 

 

 

 

 

We are celebrating Women’s History Month!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LANGUAGE GROUP

Michelle Obama launched a campaign to end childhood obesity while she was First Lady of the U.S. so we thought a healthy treat would be a great snack to make this week!

Here is what we used throughout the activity: Let_s Make A Healthy Parfait

We started out a little bit backwards today by counting out how many cups we needed for our snack.  We counted out 7 cups for 7 students.

Associate quantities with number names is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Before we put together the first step of the parfait, our students had to choose the healthier food item: yogurt or ice cream.  This can be a little bit challenging, especially since some students like to pick what they’d LIKE to eat rather than what’s BETTER for us to eat 🙂

 

 

Once they chose the correct ingredient, it was put into the cups.  Next, we moved on to choosing whether chocolate chips or strawberries was the healthier choice.  Once we decided the correct ingredient, that was put into the cups.

 

 

 

 

Next up was oreos or cheerios.  Again, the healthier choice was added to the cup.

Finally, our students had to indicate whether honey or chocolate sauce was healthier.  (You can really see which kiddos love the sweets more with these types of quizzes!).  Of course, the honey went on top.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Each student had to request that they WANTED their snack before they got it.

 

 

 

 

 

Healthy choices aren’t so bad after all——–YUM!

 

 

 

We had fun celebrating Women’s History Month and hope you did too! Our spring break is coming up so we will be back in two weeks for more fun and learning—–Group by Group!

 

February After Party

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Welcome to the After Party! Each week after the weekly blog featuring activities in the elementary department is posted, our sensory cart is parked in the media center where it is available for check out by the rest of the school.

Here are photos teachers have sent of their students exploring the different sensory boxes during the month of February 2018.

 

 

 

We started the month learning about characters in Ancient Myths and Legends.

Lots of hearts were found in our box dedicated to Venus, the roman goddess of love.

The made butterfly wings in sparkly play dough.

Our Osiris box had crops to plant along with Egyptian figures and some pyramids.

 

 

 

 

They were really intrigued with the Artemis night sky umbrella!

Very eye catching!

 

 

 

 

 

 

There was “sunny” Apollo oobleck to explore and

a sea filled with creatures Norse goddess Nott would like.

 

 

 

 

Next we celebrated all things football with our Super Bowl unit.

 

 

 

The students explored football shaped beans while looking for the number 2—there are 2 teams in the Super Bowl.

The numbers 5 and 2 for the 52nd Super Bowl were scooped up in the water play.

 

 

 

 

Patriotic pasta was fun for scooping or sorting.

The students loved the different shapes.

 

 

 

Super Bowl party play food was buried in popcorn kernels.

The students really liked the ones that made noise when squeezed 🙂

 

 

 

 

 

Cheerleader pompoms are always a hit.

We included a recording of half time show star Justin Timberlake.

 

 

 

 

 

 

There were beads in the colors of the Philadelphia Eagles.

The students always have fun with these.

 

 

 

 

Our next unit was also sports related—-the Winter Olympics!

 

 

 

 

 

This box was filled with a variety of items related to the Winter Olympics including the Olympic theme recorded on a voice output device.

The students had lots of fun with the noise makers!

 

 

 

 

The students mixed food coloring with shaving cream to make——

the  olympic flames!

 

 

 

 

 

Since we were learning about the Winter games, we had to have SNOW!

Insta Snow is always fun!

 

 

 

 

The students made the olympic rings out of chenille stems.

Bendable and soft, they always enjoy manipulating them.

 

 

 

Our ice skating box contained some discovery bottles and fabric.

The shiny fabric was particularly eye catching!

 

 

 

 

We scooped olympic rings made out of pool noodles and

made gold medals out of play dough!

 

 

 

 

We finished the month with a trip to Paris!

 

 

 

 

 

 

The students loved our Night Time in Paris umbrella.

There were photos of moonlit Paris landmarks to find.

 

 

 

 

More symbols of Paris and France were found in this box.

We included native animals, pictures of famous people, and a squeaky “french pastry” that was a hit!

 

 

 

We made the “Catacombs of Paris” out of kinetic sand and some halloween skeletons!

They had a lot of fun here.

 

 

 

 

Our rice was the colors of the French flag and there were letter P’s for Paris to find.

There was also a map of France at the bottom of the box.

 

 

 

The students practiced scooping skills with coffee—-a favorite beverage in Paris!

It had a great aroma too!

 

 

 

 

During our research we found out that Plaster of Paris actually comes from Paris!

Since we couldn’t use the real stuff we made our own by mixing shaving cream and cornstarch—it had a really different texture that the students found intriguing!

 

 

 

Messy hands were rinsed in a little duck pond.

These ducks light up when in the water—-too cool!

 

 

 

 

 

See you next time—–Group by Group!

Sleeping Beauty book

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To celebrate National Tell A Fairy Tale Day (Feb. 26), we decided to focus on the fairy tale Sleeping Beauty.  Our book takes a look at some of the main characters that are in Sleeping Beauty.  We have our students modeling costumes for each of these characters.

Our art teacher, Ms. Judy, and her students once again outdid themselves with the beautiful background.  Take a look and see the different characters that are part of this magical fairy tale.

 

 

 

 

Here is a link to the book: Who Are The Characters In Sleeping Beauty?

Sleeping Beauty

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February 26 was national Tell a Fairy Tale Day so we chose one of our favorites, Sleeping Beauty! It also helped that we had costumes to go with the story 🙂 The sensory groups explored boxes related to different characters in the story. The fine motor groups used cardboard to make their art projects and the language group made a fairy tale inspired tasty treat!

 

 

 

 

SENSORY GROUP

There were some magical things to find amongst the sprinkled silk leaves and flower petals in this box. We included some princess and fairy figures in addition to some woodland animals. One of the birds included made authentic chirping sounds.

 

 

The real hits of the box were the tiara, knights helmet, and lighted magic wand—-the students really had fun with these!

The science access points recognize a model of a real object and recognize sources of light can be addressed here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pink rice seemed perfect for Sleeping Beauty’s box. There was a picture of the princess herself to find at the bottom of the box and letters S and B to scoop up.

 

 

 

Match objects by an observable property, such as shape, is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

The students stamped the letter P for Prince or Princess in some blue Bubber. The smooth texture of Bubber is always intriguing to our students—-the adults kind of like it too 🙂

 

 

 

Apply a push to move an object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

There were some different textures to explore with our grey Floam. We included some laminated castle props, some “thorny” plastic holly leaves, and a dragon.

This was a fun box!

 

 

The science access point apply a push to move an object is again addressed here.

 

 

 

 

With all the fairies in this story, we thought some magical fairy lights would be a perfect addition to our boxes this week. In addition to the colorful lights, we added some silver tinsel to give it extra sparkle. It was pretty cool looking, especially when we turned off the lights!

 

 

Recognize sources of light is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

Neon purple food coloring along with purple glitter made Maleficent’s oobleck really eye catching this week. Even some of our students who are usually averse to messy play couldn’t resist touching it this time!

 

 

Recognize that pushing and pulling an object makes it move is a science access point.

More photos because this was really fun…..

…..and we believe that fun is an important access point too 🙂

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hands were rinsed in a pond filled with 2 floating lighted flowers, a big scoop, and a funnel.

 

 

 

 

 

Track objects in motion is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

“Be enchanted” from Bath and BodyWorks was the perfect scent to go with our theme this week! It was a nice soft scent that the students loved—-whether rubbed on hands, arms, or behind ears!

 

 

 

Recognize one or more external body parts is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

FINE MOTOR GROUP

On Tuesday we made some fairy wands! We pre-glued cake pop sticks to cardboard stars.

We started by asking the students to identify a star shape.

Recognize and object with a two-dimensional shape is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

They each put 1 glittery sticker on to their star.

 

 

 

 

 

Recognize when an object is added to a situation, is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

Then they used adaptive table-top scissors to snip a length of ribbon.

Apply a push to move an object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The students helped tie a knot in the ribbon—-a great way to practice bilateral coordination.

Recognize that pushing and pulling an object makes it move is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ta Da!

 

 

 

 

 

                                                                       Time to make a wish!

 

 

 

 

 

On Wednesday, the students became fire breathing dragons! We loved these on Pinterest and thought our students would also!

First, using communication symbols,  they identified the color of their paper covering the cardboard roll.

Identify objects by one observable property, such as color, is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We started by having the students tear red and yellow tissue paper into small strips. This is a great activity for bilateral coordination.

 

Recognize a change in the appearance of an object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

Then they painted some glue on to the inside of their toilet paper roll.

 

 

 

 

The science access point recognize a change in the appearance of an object is addressed here.

 

 

 

 

 

Next, they attached their tissue paper strips to the glue.

 

 

 

 

 

Recognize when an object is added to a situation, is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

Two green pompoms were added to make the dragons nose.

Match one object to a designated space to show one-to-one correspondence is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ta———da!

 

 

 

 

 

                                                                         There be dragons here!

 

 

 

 

LANGUAGE GROUP

We had lots of fun making our wicked Maleficent smoothies this week during the language group!  Here is the recipe that we used: Let_s Make A Maleficent Smoothie

We started out by each of our students touching the bag of frozen blueberries.  They indicated that the blueberries felt COLD.

 

 

 

Recognize objects or materials as warm or cold is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

We measured out a cup and had a student request to HELP put them in the blender.

Next, we put a cup of frozen mangoes in the blender.  Since we had felt the frozen blueberries, we asked the students what they thought the frozen mangoes would feel like, and again, they had to indicate COLD.

Recognize when an object is added to a situation is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

We added some vanilla Greek yogurt to the blender next.  Each time we talked about WHERE we were putting the ingredients.  The students would either verbalize BLENDER or they would indicate it on their communication board.

 

Finally, we added some milk to the blender.

 

 

 

 

After all of the ingredients were in the blender, we had our students predict what color they thought the smoothie would be once the ingredients were all blended up.  Then, each student got to help turn the blender on using a wireless switch.

 

 

Recognize that electrical systems must be turned on in order to work is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

It took a lot of mixing but once the ingredients were ready, we counted out how many cups we needed for our friends and poured some smoothie into 6 cups.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

But we weren’t done yet!  We wanted to add some green to the purple smoothie to represent Maleficent’s face.  We put some cool whip into a bowl and added some green food coloring.  Our students helped count out 5 drops.  Then we watched as the white cool whip turned green.

 

Recognize a change in the appearance of an object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

We added some of the cool whip to each of the cups and then each student had to request that they WANTED a smoothie to DRINK.

 

 

 

It was wickedly delicious 🙂

 

 

 

What a magical week! Join us again next time for more fun and learning—–Group by Group!