Tag Archives: adaptive scissors

Sharky’s Band

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This was a really fun week! Not only were we excited about our original book, but the whole unit was a blast. To add to the fun, on Thursday it was Take your Child to School Day so we had a couple of extra special guests this week!

 

 

Our sensory groups explored boxes with an aquatic theme. The fine motor groups painted with corn syrup to make their watery art projects and the language group made a “fishy” treat!

 

 

 

 

SENSORY GROUP

Our undersea umbrella is one of our favorites and has a pretty magical feel. We recorded the song “under the sea” from the Little Mermaid on our voice output device which added to the experience!

 

 

 

 

Match living things to their habitats is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

Sharky’s band box featured a cute shark puppet, a lighted sea urchin toy,  and plush crab that made noise when squeezed. Of course, we included some musical instruments such as a ukulele, tambourine, and a colorful wooden noise maker—–this box was lots of fun!

 

The science access point recognize and respond to common sounds can be addressed here.

Here are a few more photos——

 

 

 

 

 

 

————-there was so much to explore!!!

 

 

 

 

 

This box was filled with color! The students molded pink Floam to make their own coral reefs. A sea turtle, fish, and octopus  could be added to the scene.

 

 

 

 

Recognize a model of a real object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

We thought that our kinetic sand was a little like the sandy bottom of the ocean! There were a variety of “fishy” play dough stamps, sea shells, and a starfish  to press into the sand.

 

 

 

 

Apply a push to move an object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

There were 3 ocean themed discovery bottles that were very intriguing to the students—–very eye catching! Various items were in each bottle, including a toy submarine, some toy crabs, plastic fish, and a little toy submarine.

 

 

 

Track objects in motion is a science access point.

We also included some ocean blue pom pom yarn which was  a hit with some of the students 🙂

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The students made waves or practiced writing the letter S in the “ocean foam” shaving cream tray.

 

 

 

 

Recognize that pushing or pulling an object makes it move is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

Our miniature ocean featured some plastic “kelp” strands, a shipwreck, a glowing octopus, and a couple of cute fish. The students found the kelp particularly intriguing!

 

 

 

Recognize a model of a real object is a science access point.

 

 

 

Our little ocean also featured bubbles which were totally giggle producing!

 

 

 

 

 

Track objects in motion is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

Bath and Body Works has an ocean scent so of course we used it this week. Not sure if it actually smells like the ocean but it was pretty popular with the students 🙂

 

 

 

Recognize one or more external body parts is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

FINE MOTOR GROUP

On Tuesday the students made a Sharky picture using this: shark

First, we identified the shape of our paper using communication symbols.

 

 

 

 

Recognize objects with two-dimensional shapes is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

The students squeezed glue to the back of their shark……

 

 

 

 

 

 

…………..and then patted it DOWN on to their paper.

Recognize a movement that reflects a spatial relationship, is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A googlie eye was added. This is an opportunity to work on pincer grasp or index isolation skills.

Match one object to a designated space to show one-to-one correspondence is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Then the students used paint brushes to spread corn syrup (tinted with food coloring) around their paper. When the corn syrup dries it still looks shiny and wet—–very cool!

 

 

 

Recognize that pushing and pulling an object makes it move is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

Some of the students used our adaptive paintbrush made by taping a regular brush to a wooden paint stirrer. While we helped keep the brush stabilized, the students actively moved the paintbrush around.

 

 

 

Again, recognize that pushing and pulling an object makes it move is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

TA DA!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hello Sharky!!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On Wednesday the students colored some pop up cards Ms. Kim gave us—-perfect for our unit!

First the students identified the shape of their cards using communication symbols. They also identified the color of out corn syrup!

Recognize objects with two-dimensional shapes is a math access point.

Identify objects by one observable property, such as color, is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

The students used crayons to color the details of the card.  When needed, adults helped the students differentiate different features and encouraged the use of different colors.

 

 

 

Recognize parts of objects is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

After they had finished coloring, the students added some of the colored corn syrup for a watery feel. They also added a picture of themselves wearing a mask and snorkel—-it looked super cute!

The math access point recognize when an object is added to a situation is addressed here.

 

 

 

 

 

TA DA!!!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Splish splash under the sea!

 

 

 

 

 

 

LANGUAGE GROUP

We made a snack that we think Sharky and his band would really enjoy!  This week, we made an ocean in a cup.  Here’s the recipe we used: Let_s Make An Ocean In A Cup

We started out by putting vanilla pudding mix and milk into a bowl.  Each student got to feel the milk before we poured it in.  They had to indicate on their communication boards whether it was HOT or COLD.

 

 

Recognize objects or materials as hot or cold is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

For the students who put the ingredients in the bowl, they had to first indicate HELP to inform that they wanted to help out.

 

 

 

 

 

Our students are getting better and better at using their communication boards!

 

 

 

 

 

Next, we added some blue food coloring to the ingredients.  Each student got to look in the bowl before we began mixing.  We talked about how it would look DIFFERENT once it was mixed.  The symbol for ‘different’ was modeled by adults.

Recognize a change in the appearance of an object or material is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

Each student got to HELP turn the mixer on.  They had to indicate MORE to inform that more mixing was needed and ALL DONE to indicate that no more mixing was necessary.

 

 

 

 

Solve problems involving small quantities of objects or actions using language, such as enough, too much, or more is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

Next, each student helped crush some graham crackers.  Again, the word DIFFERENT was used to show how the graham crackers looked once they were crushed up.

The science access point recognize a change in the appearance of an object, is addressed here.

 

 

 

 

 

Then we counted out how many cups we needed.  Each student got to have their cup right in front of them.  They each PUT some of the graham cracker “sand” in their cups.

 

 

 

Associate quantities with number names is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

We added 3 spoonfuls of pudding “ocean water” into the cup next, counting each spoonful as they were scooped out.

 

 

 

 

 

Finally, each student got 3 gummy fish.  They had to put each of them in their cup.  This required some prompting since each student wanted to put the fish directly into their mouths 🙂

Done!  It looks like an ocean in a cup but sure doesn’t taste like one 🙂  YUM!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We think we pulled off another great week!

Join us again next time for more fun and learning—–Group by Group!

South Africa

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We are traveling again this week—-all the way to South Africa! Cara recently got to visit her sister who lives there and brought back amazing photos, some of which we used in the book this week. The sensory groups explored boxes related to facts about South Africa. The fine motor groups crafted symbols of the country and the language group made a South African inspired treat.

 

 

 

 

SENSORY GROUP

It takes a VERY long plane ride to get to South Africa! Our students got to get a little of the airplane experience with our vibrating tube and jet sounds recorded on a voice output device.

 

 

Recognize and respond to different types of sensory stimuli is a science access point.

 

 

This vibrating tube was really popular!

 

 

 

 

 

The students LOVED it!!!

 

 

 

 

 

South Africa is known as the “Rainbow Nation” due to the variety of cultures and languages spoken there. We included fluffy chenille stems and sparkly beads in the rainbow of colors found in the South African flag.

 

 

Match objects with similar observable properties, such as color, is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

Gold is one of the countries natural resources. We included S and A cookie cutters in this box of gold kinetic sand. While stamping the letters was fun, nothing beats watching the kinetic sand ooze and move through fingers. We still love this stuff 🙂

 

 

 

Recognize that pushing and pulling an object makes it move is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

Going on a safari is one of the highlights of a South African vacation. We included a variety of animals you might see while on safari—-and some binoculars to see them better! There was also a play camera, some sunglasses, a cheetah headband, and a fun lion visor. Lots of fun with this box!

 

Recognize a model of a real object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

You can see penguins on the beach there—-how cool is that!!! We put a couple of cool penguins and a fun sifting spoon in this box. There was also a picture of a penguin to find at the bottom of the box.

 

 

 

Match living things with their habitats is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

We learned that kids in South Africa like to eat candy called Fizzers. We decided to make our own—— SORT OF! We added pop rocks to our oobleck to make it sound “fizzy”, kind of a stretch but the students thought it was fun 🙂

 

 

Use senses to recognize objects is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

There are lots of different animals to see along the coast including whales and sharks like the ones we put in our water play this week. Our little whale was extra special because it lit up when placed in the water—-very eye catching!

 

 

Match living things with their habitats is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

Citrus crops are grown in South Africa so we chose Bath and Body Works orange scent for this week. The students thought the scent was pretty yummy!

 

 

 

 

Recognize one or more external body parts is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

FINE MOTOR GROUP

On Tuesday the students used this for their art project: springbok

First, they identified the color of our paper.

 

 

 

 

 

Identify objects by one observable property, such as color, is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

Then they used adaptive tabletop scissors to fringe the edge of their paper into “grass”.

 

 

 

 

Recognize a change in the appearance of an object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

Some of the students used  switch operated scissors to make their “grass”.

 

 

 

 

 

                                                                    It is kind of fun 🙂

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Glue was applied and the “grass” was rolled on to a paper tube.  We found that using a piece of tape helped the paper stay in place.

 

 

 

 

Apply a push to move an object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

A beautiful springbok antelope (colored by our great volunteers—-thanks Lauren and Madison) was added to the scene.

 

 

 

 

 

Some of the students needed a little help with this part.

 

 

 

 

 

TA DA!

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                                               Let’s go on safari!!!!

 

 

 

 

On Wednesday the students made another symbol of South Africa—- the Protea flower. It is a pretty intriguing looking flower and we think our project turned out equally so!

First, they identified the shape of the paper plate we were using. Thanks Ms. Kim for the fabulous pink plates!

 

 

 

 

 

Recognize objects with two-dimensional shapes is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

Then they used a variety of cutting tools to snip the edges of the paper plate into points.

 

 

 

 

Recognize a change in the appearance of an object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

After they had finished cutting their flower petals, the students applied glue to the plate and added some yellow paper shred.

Recognize when an object is added to a situation is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

To finish the inside of the flower and get the rounded look it has, we used a styrofoam ball that had been cut in half and glued it to the center. To give it a little color and sparkle we painted it with some red glitter glue.

Recognize parts of whole objects is a math access point that can be addressed here.

 

 

 

 

The Protea was hot glued to a paper towel  tube and….. TA DA!!!!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                                               Let’s visit South Africa!

 

 

 

 

LANGUAGE GROUP

In South Africa, people eat a lot of meat.  Since we don’t typically make anything that has meat in it since we try and find recipes that don’t involve cooking, we had to find some other popular foods.  Cara’s sister said that people in South Africa like to also eat lots of citrus.  After a lot of deliberation on what recipe to make to represent South Africa, we decided to make a smoothie.  Here is a link to the recipe: Let_s Make A South African Mango Tangerine Smoothie

The first ingredient of the recipe was frozen mangoes.  Each of our students felt the bag of the frozen mangoes.  They had to indicate on their board whether the mangoes felt HOT or COLD.

 

 

Recognize objects as warm or cold is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

Then they had to locate the common core vocabulary word PUT on their boards to indicate that we had to put the mangoes into the blender.  We had a volunteer to help us by indicating HELP.

Recognize when an object is added to a situation is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

Next, we added some sliced up tangerine.  Again, we talked about how the tangerine slices were COLD.  Again, we reinforced the word PUT and also located the picture of the blender to show where the slices needed to be put.

We had another student locate HELP in order to help put the frozen banana slices into the blender.

 

 

 

Then, we added some vanilla Greek yogurt.  We located the measuring cup to show that we needed to use it to measure out how much yogurt we needed and a student helped PUT it into the blender.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Finally, we measured out some honey.  We talked about using measuring spoons because we needed a SMALL amount.  Each student got to taste some of the honey.

Students had to indicate whether it tasted SWEET or SOUR.

 

 

 

 

 

Once all the ingredients were in the blender, each student got to use a switch to turn on the blender.  Students had to indicate MORE on their communication boards to keep the blender going until the ingredients were all mixed up and smooth.

Operating the blender is always lots of fun 🙂

 

 

 

Finally, we got to sample our smoothie!

It looked and tasted pretty yummy!

 

 

 

 

 

The students used their communication boards and devices to let us know if they wanted MORE.

 

 

 

Another great week! Join us again next time for more fun and learning—–Group by Group!

 

Sleeping Beauty

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February 26 was national Tell a Fairy Tale Day so we chose one of our favorites, Sleeping Beauty! It also helped that we had costumes to go with the story 🙂 The sensory groups explored boxes related to different characters in the story. The fine motor groups used cardboard to make their art projects and the language group made a fairy tale inspired tasty treat!

 

 

 

 

SENSORY GROUP

There were some magical things to find amongst the sprinkled silk leaves and flower petals in this box. We included some princess and fairy figures in addition to some woodland animals. One of the birds included made authentic chirping sounds.

 

 

The real hits of the box were the tiara, knights helmet, and lighted magic wand—-the students really had fun with these!

The science access points recognize a model of a real object and recognize sources of light can be addressed here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pink rice seemed perfect for Sleeping Beauty’s box. There was a picture of the princess herself to find at the bottom of the box and letters S and B to scoop up.

 

 

 

Match objects by an observable property, such as shape, is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

The students stamped the letter P for Prince or Princess in some blue Bubber. The smooth texture of Bubber is always intriguing to our students—-the adults kind of like it too 🙂

 

 

 

Apply a push to move an object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

There were some different textures to explore with our grey Floam. We included some laminated castle props, some “thorny” plastic holly leaves, and a dragon.

This was a fun box!

 

 

The science access point apply a push to move an object is again addressed here.

 

 

 

 

With all the fairies in this story, we thought some magical fairy lights would be a perfect addition to our boxes this week. In addition to the colorful lights, we added some silver tinsel to give it extra sparkle. It was pretty cool looking, especially when we turned off the lights!

 

 

Recognize sources of light is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

Neon purple food coloring along with purple glitter made Maleficent’s oobleck really eye catching this week. Even some of our students who are usually averse to messy play couldn’t resist touching it this time!

 

 

Recognize that pushing and pulling an object makes it move is a science access point.

More photos because this was really fun…..

…..and we believe that fun is an important access point too 🙂

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hands were rinsed in a pond filled with 2 floating lighted flowers, a big scoop, and a funnel.

 

 

 

 

 

Track objects in motion is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

“Be enchanted” from Bath and BodyWorks was the perfect scent to go with our theme this week! It was a nice soft scent that the students loved—-whether rubbed on hands, arms, or behind ears!

 

 

 

Recognize one or more external body parts is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

FINE MOTOR GROUP

On Tuesday we made some fairy wands! We pre-glued cake pop sticks to cardboard stars.

We started by asking the students to identify a star shape.

Recognize and object with a two-dimensional shape is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

They each put 1 glittery sticker on to their star.

 

 

 

 

 

Recognize when an object is added to a situation, is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

Then they used adaptive table-top scissors to snip a length of ribbon.

Apply a push to move an object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The students helped tie a knot in the ribbon—-a great way to practice bilateral coordination.

Recognize that pushing and pulling an object makes it move is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ta Da!

 

 

 

 

 

                                                                       Time to make a wish!

 

 

 

 

 

On Wednesday, the students became fire breathing dragons! We loved these on Pinterest and thought our students would also!

First, using communication symbols,  they identified the color of their paper covering the cardboard roll.

Identify objects by one observable property, such as color, is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We started by having the students tear red and yellow tissue paper into small strips. This is a great activity for bilateral coordination.

 

Recognize a change in the appearance of an object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

Then they painted some glue on to the inside of their toilet paper roll.

 

 

 

 

The science access point recognize a change in the appearance of an object is addressed here.

 

 

 

 

 

Next, they attached their tissue paper strips to the glue.

 

 

 

 

 

Recognize when an object is added to a situation, is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

Two green pompoms were added to make the dragons nose.

Match one object to a designated space to show one-to-one correspondence is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ta———da!

 

 

 

 

 

                                                                         There be dragons here!

 

 

 

 

LANGUAGE GROUP

We had lots of fun making our wicked Maleficent smoothies this week during the language group!  Here is the recipe that we used: Let_s Make A Maleficent Smoothie

We started out by each of our students touching the bag of frozen blueberries.  They indicated that the blueberries felt COLD.

 

 

 

Recognize objects or materials as warm or cold is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

We measured out a cup and had a student request to HELP put them in the blender.

Next, we put a cup of frozen mangoes in the blender.  Since we had felt the frozen blueberries, we asked the students what they thought the frozen mangoes would feel like, and again, they had to indicate COLD.

Recognize when an object is added to a situation is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

We added some vanilla Greek yogurt to the blender next.  Each time we talked about WHERE we were putting the ingredients.  The students would either verbalize BLENDER or they would indicate it on their communication board.

 

Finally, we added some milk to the blender.

 

 

 

 

After all of the ingredients were in the blender, we had our students predict what color they thought the smoothie would be once the ingredients were all blended up.  Then, each student got to help turn the blender on using a wireless switch.

 

 

Recognize that electrical systems must be turned on in order to work is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

It took a lot of mixing but once the ingredients were ready, we counted out how many cups we needed for our friends and poured some smoothie into 6 cups.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

But we weren’t done yet!  We wanted to add some green to the purple smoothie to represent Maleficent’s face.  We put some cool whip into a bowl and added some green food coloring.  Our students helped count out 5 drops.  Then we watched as the white cool whip turned green.

 

Recognize a change in the appearance of an object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

We added some of the cool whip to each of the cups and then each student had to request that they WANTED a smoothie to DRINK.

 

 

 

It was wickedly delicious 🙂

 

 

 

What a magical week! Join us again next time for more fun and learning—–Group by Group!

 

 

Taiwan

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We were lucky enough to be visited by an acrobatic school group from Taiwan. They were absolutely amazing and made us want to find out more about their country. Our sensory groups explored boxes related to facts about the country. The fine motor groups decorated dragons to use in dragon boat races hosted by the language group.

 

 

 

SENSORY GROUP

Red, white, and blue are the colors found in the Taiwanese flag so we had our students sort pompoms in those colors. We included a laminated flag for reference.

 

 

 

Identify objects by one observable property, such as color, is a science access point.

The math access point recognize three-dimensional, such as balls (spheres), can also be addressed here.

 

 

 

 

We used a bird shaped cookie cutter in blue moon sand to represent the Blue Magpie which is the national bird of Taiwan.

 

 

 

 

Apply a push to move an object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

Tea is a popular drink in Taiwan. Our box of tea contained the letters T-E-A for our students to find as well as a map at the bottom of the box. There were also 2 different sized spoons which made for lots of scooping fun.

 

 

 

Recognize similarities and differences in sizes of objects is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

The Formosan Black Bear is the national animal of Taiwan. The students really liked the feel of the black bear “fur” and cuddling with the cute plush black bear cub.

 

 

 

Recognize objects related to science by name, such as ice, animal, and plant, is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

Ang Li, who is from Taiwan, directed the movie The Hulk.  Our green kinetic sand was definitely the right pick for this box. Since we didn’t have a Hulk action figure on hand, we made our own laminated one and the students seemed pretty happy with what we came up with.

 

Recognize that pushing and pulling an object makes it move is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

We practiced making the letter T for Taiwan and had lots of fun scribbling in the shaving cream this week.

 

 

 

 

The science access point recognize the change in the motion of an object can be addressed here.

 

 

 

 

Taiwan is made up of lots of islands so fishing is an important part of the economy. We put different sized scoops and two cute little squirting fish in the water play this week.

This turned out to be a really fun activity and the students had a blast.

 

Track the movement of objects that are pushed or pulled is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

Plum blossoms are a symbol of Taiwan so we used Victoria’s Secret plum scented bath gel and lotion this week. The light floral scent was really popular with the students.

 

 

 

Recognize and respond to one type of sensory stimuli is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

FINE MOTOR GROUP

Joy drew these dragons on poster board and gave each of the classes one to decorate. Two of our classes decorated theirs during Fine Motor group time.

 

On Tuesday the students decorated their dragon in their team color—-PURPLE.

First the students identified the color purple using communication symbols.

 

 

 

Identify objects by one observable property, such as color, is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

Then we stamped UP and DOWN with a bubble wrapped stamper. Most of the students needed a little assistance with this but they were all very engaged in the activity!

 

 

Recognize a movement that reflects a spatial relationship, such as up and down, is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

We sprinkled on some confetti for a little added sparkle.

 

 

 

 

Recognize a change in an object is a science access point that can be addressed here.

 

 

 

 

 

TA DA!!

 

 

 

 

 

The Purple Dragons are ready to rumble!

 

 

 

 

 

On Wednesday the Pink team decorated their dragons.

First, we identified the color of our markers using communication symbols.

Identify objects by one observable property, such as color, is a science access point.

We also identified the number 3 because each student was asked to draw 3 lines on the dragon.

Associate quantities with number names is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

A variety of PINK markers were used for this activity and the students were encouraged to draw straight lines but, of course, any effort was applauded 🙂

 

 

 

 

The math access point solve problems involving small quantities of objects or actions using language, such as enough, too much, or more, can be addressed here.

 

 

 

 

We sang our glitter song while adding some PINK glitter.

Recognize a change in motion of an object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We used both regular and adaptive scissors to cut some Pink paper streamers and attached them to the dragon.

Recognize a change in an object, is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

TA DA!

 

 

 

 

 

Hear those Pink Dragons ROAR!!!

 

 

 

 

 

LANGUAGE GROUP

We had LOTS of fun in the language group this week.  We learned that each year, Taiwan has a big Dragon Boat race so we thought it’d be fun to have our OWN dragon race. Each elementary classroom chose their team color.

 

 

 

 

Before we began racing, we talked to the students about going FAST in the race.

Recognize a motion as FAST or SLOW is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

Everyone had to wait until they saw the signal to GO (we used the Pixon communication symbol for “go”)

 

 

 

 

…………..and they were off.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

All the students and teachers ran down until they got to the red ribbon finish line.

 

 

 

 

 

We have some really fast teachers and students!

 

 

 

 

The competition was fierce…..

 

 

 

 

 

 

…..and there were some close finishes!

 

 

 

 

We talked about who was the fastest and won the race.  The top 2 fastest classes won trophies and the other classes each won medals.

 

 

 

 

The pictures can’t begin to capture all of the fun we had at the race lol!  We might have to make this an annual event as well 🙂

 

 

Join us again next week for more fun and learning

                               Group by Group!

National Parks

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November 17 is National Take a Hike Day so we decided it would be great time to learn a little more about some of our national parks. Our sensory groups explored boxes related to specific parks. The fine motor groups made art projects featuring things you might see on a hike. The language group made a hike worthy snack!

 

 

 

 

SENSORY GROUP

Our Smokey Mountain National Park box was filled with things you might see while hiking here. There were leaves, pine cones, plastic pine needles, and plush animals including a bird that chirped when squeezed. There were also a pair of binoculars that were a hit.

Match living things with their habitats is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

Volcano National Park in Hawaii has a very unique landscape—-flowing lava! Black kinetic sand moves a lot like lava and with a piece of red plastic at the bottom of the box  we had our own little volcano landscape going!  The students made lava rocks with some blocks from a shape sorter.

The math access point recognize objects with two-dimensional shapes can be addressed here.

 

 

 

 

We thought our pink Floam was the perfect choice for our Grand Canyon box. Since mules are one way people get up and down the canyon we decided to put in some laminated ones of 3 different sizes for the students.

 

 

Recognize similarities and differences in size of objects is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

California has a lot of National Parks including Yosemite. For this box we used our blue and yellow rice which are the state colors. There were letter Y’s, a California magnet, and a picture of Yosemite to find at the bottom of the box. The students were especially intrigued by the magnet!

Recognize two objects that are identical to each other is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

If you want to find some dinosaur fossils, Badlands National Park is the place to go! The students had fun digging for fossils or making their own with the moon sand in this box.

 

 

 

Apply a push to move an object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

We made our Everglades swamp out of green jello and it was a HIT! Some of the students were a little hesitant but others dived right in 🙂 We put in some toy animals like alligators, snakes, lizards, and spiders—–things you might run into while exploring this national park!

 

Match living things to their habitats is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

Yellowstone National Park is known for its geysers like old faithful. When a button was pushed this bath toy sprayed water like geysers———- and produced LOTS of giggles!

 

 

 

Observe and recognize a predictable cause-effect relationship related to a science topic is a science access point.

LOTS AND LOTS AND LOTS OF GIGGLES 🙂

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bath and BodyWorks mahogany woods seemed a perfect scent for this week. The students really responded to its “woodsy” scent.

 

 

 

Recognize one or more external body parts is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

FINE MOTOR GROUP

On Tuesday our students made some black bears, like those you might spot in the Smokey Mountain National Park.

First, we discussed the shape of the day and asked the students to identify it using communication symbols.

Recognize an object with a two dimensional shape is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A black construction paper circle was cut into 2 pieces using adaptive scissors. We used either switch operated or tabletop scissors.

The math access point recognize parts of whole objects can be addressed here.

 

 

 

 

 

Then the 2 semi-circles were glued on to a black paper plate to make the ears.

Associate quantities with number names is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Then a small grey circle nose  was glued down and 2 googlie eyes were added.

 

 

 

 

Recognize when an object is added to a situation is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

TA DA!

 

 

 

 

 

                                                       Let’s go for a hike in the woods!

 

 

 

 

On Wednesday the students made a giant sequoia tree—-like the ones at Grand Sequoia National Park. In our book there is a picture of one with Jeannie’s husband standing under it so be sure to check it out!

First we discussed the color of our paint and identified it using communication symbols. We got 100% right on this one—–our students totally rock!!!!

 

 

 

 

Identify objects by one observable property, such as color, is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

Then each student got a chance to paint some leaves on our tree shape cut from some scrap foam board and its shape cut out by Ms. LaShayla—-one of our wonderful volunteers!

 

 

 

Recognize a change in an object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

We attached the tree top to our trunk made from leftover cardboard and discussed that while we were LITTLE the tree was BIG! Ms. Alexa, another of our wonderful volunteers, cut up a cardboard box to make the tree trunk.

Recognize differences in size of objects is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TA Da…….

we made a Giant Sequoia tree!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LANGUAGE GROUP

We made a protein packed smoothie this week since protein is good for energy which we need while taking a hike!  Here is the recipe we used:  Let_s Make A Peanut Butter Oatmeal Smoothie

We started by putting some vanilla soy milk into the blender.

Recognize when an object is added to a situation is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Next, each of our students got to smell the peanut butter before we put it in the blender.  This was a little confusing to some of students because they were presented with the peanut butter on a spoon 🙂  No one ate it off the spoon, though, so it was a successful smell test!

Recognize and respond to one type of sensory stimuli is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

We put 4 tablespoons of peanut butter into the blender.

Associate quantities with number names is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

After the peanut butter, we put in the frozen bananas.  Each student got to feel the bananas.  We talked about how they were COLD.

Recognize objects as warm or cold is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Finally, we added some old fashioned oats to the blender.

Recognize when an object is added to a situation is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Each of our students got to help blend up the ingredients using a wireless switch that was connected to a power link.  We made sure that it was nice and smooth.

 

 

 

Observe and recognize a predictable cause-effect relationship related to a science topic is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

Time to drink our smoothies!  Now we’re all energized 🙂

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We are glad you joined us this week and hope everyone has a very Happy Thanksgiving! We will be back after the holiday with more fun, learning, and smiles——-

                                                                ——Group by Group!

 

Youth Art Month

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March is Youth Art Month and to celebrate we learned about some famous artists. Each of the sensory group boxes represented a different artist. The fine motor group drew inspiration from some of the styles of famous artists to make their art projects and the language group made food art! This week was lots of fun and our theme also compliments the Unique Curriculum unit our students are working on.

 

 

 

 

 

SENSORY GROUP

Salvador Dali has a very famous painting with some melting clocks in a desert landscape. We replicated it using kinetic sand and some craft foam clocks (drawn by Ms. Erika) so there were 3 “melting” clocks to find. It was a fun box and the students were pretty intrigued with the clocks!

Associate quantities with number names is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

The students cut different sized stars out of our Vincent Van Gogh starry night play dough! With the added blue and gold silver glitter, it sparkled quite nicely.

Recognize similarities and differences in size of common objects is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

Harold Newton was one of the Highway Men famous for their Florida landscape paintings. This Florida box was fun to put together and filled with symbols of our state such as flamingoes, dolphins, pine trees, flowers, and oranges. Lots of things to explore!

The science access point recognize a model of a real object is addressed here.

 

 

 

 

 

Olivia is a character in illustrator Ian Falconer’s book series.  Since Olivia is a pig, we went all pink with this box. We pulled out our pink sand and included a cute little toy pig. This play sand is really fine and perfect for sifting—-our students LOVED watching it fall from the sifter back into the box!

Track a falling object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

Piet Mondrian used primary colors for his grid paintings. We put blue, red, and yellow pompoms to sort into matching plates in this box. Some of the students could do this independently while others needed help.

Either way, this was a very bright, eye catching box!

Match objects by one observable properties, such as color, is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

Shaving cream was perfect for drawing geometric shapes—–like those used by Alexander Calder in his mobiles.

The science access point apply a push to move an object is addressed here.

 

 

 

 

Hands were rinsed in a seascape worthy of JMW Turner. There was a little sailing ship and octopus to find in the water. There were also 2 scoops, one of which had a hole in the bottom for some fun experimentation as well as scooping practice.

The science access point recognize differences in objects can be addressed here.

 

 

 

 

 

Flowers are the theme of some of Georgia O’Keefe’s famous paintings. She made one called Plumeria so we used that as our scent this week. We used Bath and Bodyworks plumeria and it was a light floral scent that the students really liked.

Recognize and respond to one type of sensory stimuli is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

FINE MOTOR GROUP

On Tuesday the students made “drip” paintings like Jackson Pollock.

First we discussed the shape of our paper and identified it using communication symbols.

Recognize objects with two-dimensional shapes is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Then the students used more communication symbols to pick colors to use.

Identify objects by one observable property, such as color, is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We used these kids eye droppers that we found at Walmart.  They were fairly inexpensive and a nice size. Most of the students needed a little help with this part of the activity. They were all fascinated with the process!

The science access point recognize a change in an object is addressed here.

 

 

 

 

Ta Da!!!!!!!!!!!!

                                                                                    So colorful!

 

 

 

 

 

On Wednesday the students made art projects inspired by Gustav Klimt.

We discussed the shape of our paper and identified it using communication symbols.

Recognize objects with two-dimensional shapes is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Then the students used a variety of cutting tools—-paper cutters, adaptive scissors, and regular scissors—-to cut strips of colorful paper.

Recognize a change in an object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

Next we mixed all the pieces together and shared them among the students to turn OVER and glue DOWN on to their paper.

Recognize a movement that reflects a spatial relationship, such as up and down, is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Klimt liked to add gold leaf to his paintings. We didn’t have any gold leaf but we did have gold paint and that worked pretty well!

The science access point recognize a change in an object is again addressed here.

 

 

 

 

 

Ta Da!

                                                                                Just fabulous!

 

 

 

 

 

LANGUAGE GROUP

Since you know that we like to incorporate food into our language groups, it was a great excuse to use food to make art!

Each of our students got a piece of white bread which served as their blank canvas.  We started out talking about the primary colors: RED, BLUE, and YELLOW.

Identify objects by one observable property, such as color, is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

We poured some sweetened condensed milk into 5 small cups.  We put RED food coloring into one cup, BLUE food coloring into another cup, and YELLOW food coloring into a third cup (we put 10 drops of each coloring into each cup).  Then the students got to stir the colors using brand new paint brushes!

Recognize a change in an object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

We the talked about mixing the primary colors to make new colors. First we showed our students RED and BLUE and asked them to PREDICT what color it would make.  We did the same with BLUE and YELLOW.

Then the students mixed up the colors again—–they thought it was really neat to see the colors changing!

Observe and recognize a predictable cause-effect relationship related to a science topic is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

Next, each of our students used communication symbols to indicate what color they wanted to paint with.

The colors ended up being so vibrant on the bread—-they really popped!

We found that we have some pretty good artists in our group!

 

 

 

 

Finally, after their edible art was complete, they got to eat their masterpieces.

YUM!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We will be gone next week for spring break but will back in a couple of weeks with more fun and learning——-Group by Group!

We Love Star Wars

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IMG_3481The Force was with us as we explored a galaxy far, far away——it was all about Star Wars with fantastic galactic fun for all our groups and some special  guests who joined us on “bring your child to work” day! The sensory boxes had things to touch, smell, look at, and listen to! Pinterest helped us find ideas for our fine motor groups and language groups!

 

 

 

 

 

SENSORY GROUP

IMG_3756IMG_3769Our galaxy umbrella was a HUGE hit with the students. We used some scrap headliner fabric attached to poster board to make our Death Star and were totally pleased with the result! There were some little spaceships attached with fishing wire and with the Star Wars theme recorded on the voice output device this was one super cool umbrella—–the students LOVED it!

IMG_3605Recognize a source of light energy is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_3442IMG_3504We put a variety of Star Wars paraphernalia into this box. There were figures and key chains representing of some of the main characters from the movies (thank you Jeannie for the donation). We found a fun “light saber” at the Family Dollar Store and the students had a blast with it—–lights and sounds with the push of a button, how cool is that!

IMG_3854The science access point observe and recognize a predictable cause-effect relationship can be addressed here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_3859

IMG_3789Luke Skywalker lived on the planet Tatooine which has a desert landscape. Our homemade “sand” had a little bit of cinnamon in it so it was not only not only fun to touch but it smelled really good too!

IMG_3638We put in a variety of wooden shapes so our students could build some local “structures”.

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_3521IMG_3608Recognize common three-dimensional objects such as cylinders or cubes is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_3508IMG_3446 (1)Of course, we had to include a box dedicated to the ultimate bad guy—–Darth Vader! We put in some accessories from a “Darth Tater” kit in a box with our grey Floam so the students could build their own Vader.

IMG_3479The science access point recognize that the human body is made up of various parts can be addressed with this activity.

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_3470IMG_3649Kraft mac and cheese came out with  these cool Star Wars pasta shapes. It took a couple of hours to dye but SO worth it! There were black Darth Vaders, yellow CP3Os, blue R2D2s, green Yodas, and red star fighters for sorting fun. The students also loved picking up handfuls of the colorful pasta!

IMG_3798Match objects with similar observable properties, such as size, shape, color, or texture is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_3627IMG_3894We made a green jello swamp for our little Yoda—-complete with snakes, spiders, and a cute giant lizard.

 

 

IMG_3889Some of the students were a little hesitant to touch the cold, sticky goo but others thought it was pretty fantastic stuff 🙂

IMG_3454Recognize the temperature of items as cool or warm is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_3779IMG_3467Those sticky hands were rinsed off in water scented with “Ewok” mahogany woods from Bath and BodyWorks. Ms. Kim donated these fun Star Wars themed diving sticks that were perfect for our water play activity. The students really loved watching the water stream out of the bottom of these sticks!

Track objects in motion is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_3672IMG_3529The matching lotion was a hit with almost all of our students.

IMG_3902Recognize and respond to one type of sensory input is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

FINE MOTOR GROUP

On Tuesday our little Jedi turned to the dark side and made paper plate Death Stars. We adapted this idea from http://fun-a-day.com .To prep ours, we drew the lines with glue rather than white crayon.

IMG_3546IMG_3553We started by bringing out our galactic umbrella to give the students inspiration. It was a hit 🙂

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_3558After the umbrella was reluctantly put away, we discussed the shape of the paper plate and asked the students to identify the shape using communication symbols.

Recognize objects with two-dimensional shapes is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_3562IMG_3571Then the students painted over their plates with watered down grey paint using a sponge brush.

Recognize a change in an object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_3574IMG_3567Ta Da……..

IMG_3577                                        ………looks like Darth Vader is in the house 🙂

 

 

 

 

 

We went Wookie on Wednesday! The idea for this project came from http://funfamilycrafts.com

Instead of fun fur used in the original project, we used furry duct tape purchased at Walgreens. The duct tape was adhered to some 6 inch rulers to prep this for our students.

IMG_3684We started by asking the students to count how many eyes a Wookie has and to identify the number using communication symbols.

We did the same thing for the nose.

Associate quantities with number names is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_3700Next the students cut strips of paper to use for the strap that Chewbacca wears. The paper cutter worked perfectly for this task!

Recognize a change in an object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_3677Then the students glued googlie eyes, pompom noses, and strap onto their Wookies. To work on one-to-one correspondence we placed target glue dots onto the fur.

Match one object to a designated space to show one-to-one correspondence is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_3694IMG_3683Ta Da!!!!

The force is strong with these young padawans 🙂

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LANGUAGE GROUP

We made another yummy snack this week—— Galactic Ice Cream Sundaes!  Our students got to make choices of what they wanted using picture symbols, gestures, and verbalizations.

IMG_3931The first choice they got was to tell us how many scoops of ice cream they wanted in their bowl.  We used big numbers showing “1” and “2” and our students would either point or place their hand on the amount they wanted.

Associate quantities with number names is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_3952Next, they got to chose which kind of syrup they wanted: chocolate, strawberry, or butterscotch.  They were provided with symbols and again, would point or put their hand on the one they wanted.

Adjust body movement or nonverbal expression with prompting as necessary to communicate wants and needs is a language access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_3941When asked if they wanted whipped cream, they would either use head shake/nod, verbalize no/yes, or point to a symbol no/yes.  If they said yes, they had to show us how many squirts they wanted using the “1” and “2”.

They REALLY like this part 🙂

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_3943Finally, we poured some Star Wars cereal on top for a crunchy effect and let them choose which color pretzel/icing “light saber” they wanted: RED or GREEN.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_3935IMG_3947We think we hit this one out of the galaxy!

IMG_3966                                        YUM!!!!!

 

 

 

IMG_3924IMG_3898We hope your May the Fourth festivities are a blast! Be sure and join us again next time……Group by Group!