Tag Archives: discovery bottle

Let’s Go On A Cruise

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Welcome back! We hope everyone had a fun filled summer. Cara, our SLP had an especially wonderful one—-she welcomed the most beautiful baby boy to her family! With Cara on maternity leave, Joi and Joy will be doing a little scrambling to fill her shoes—-so bear with us for the next few weeks until she gets back 🙂 Thankfully Ms. Robin and Ms. Nancy are also helping us out with communication supports!

For our first theme we are chose to feature photos from some of our teachers who were lucky enough to go on a cruise over the summer! Our sensory boxes focused on places you might go or things you might see on a cruise.  The fine motor groups made boat related art projects and the language group had fun comparing a cruise to Alaska and a cruise to The Bahamas.

 

 

 

 

SENSORY GROUP

With our vibrating massager and recorded cruise ship sounds on a voice output device our students got to experience some of the feel of being on a cruise. There was also a glittery ocean themed discovery bottle.

 

Recognize and respond to different types of sensory stimuli is a science access point.

The vibrating tube was a big hit with the students 🙂

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tropical islands are popular cruise ship destinations. There were shells, a great big plastic foot for making footprints in the sand, some little palm trees, and a little crab hanging out on the beach.

The students found everything to be pretty intriguing!

 

 

 

The sifter spoon we included was especially fun!

The science access point track objects in motion can be addressed here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Our Disney cruise box included a variety of Disney paraphernalia such as cartoon figures and a set of Mickey Mouse ears. We also put in some sunglasses, beads, and some play food! Lots to explore and discover in this box.

 

 

The language access point communicate recognition of familiar objects can be addressed here.

The Mickey Mouse ears were especially popular….

 

 

 

 

 

our students totally rock a hat 🙂

 

 

 

 

There were 2 polar bears ( thank you Ms. Caressa) and a little seal playing in the snow of our Alaska cruise box. There was also a small shovel for scooping fun.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recognize similarities and differences in size of common objects is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Neon food coloring made this bright ocean blue play dough really eye catching! The students cut out boats and dolphins using cookie cutters.

 

 

 

 

Apply a push to move an object is a science access point.

This was an especially popular box this week!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We encouraged the students to make wavy motions in our shaving cream “ocean foam”.

 

 

 

 

Recognize that pushing and pulling an object makes it move is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Different animals might be spotted from a cruise ship, so we included a seal, dolphin, whale, and fun penguin strainer in our water play.

A little boat and measuring cup scoop added to the fun.

 

 

The science access point match common living things with their habitats can be addressed here.

 

 

 

 

Bath and Body Works coconut scented lotion was a perfect end to our group this week. The students really liked the aroma.

 

 

 

 


Recognize one or more external body parts is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

FINE MOTOR GROUP

On Wednesday we made cruise ship port holes using paper plates.

First the students identified a circle using communication symbols.

Recognize objects with two-dimensional shapes is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

They chose which color marker they wanted to use.

Identify objects by one observable property, such as color, is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Then they used dot markers to decorate the front of their port holes. We asked the students to stamp UP and DOWN.

 

 

 

 

Recognize a movement that reflects a spatial relationship is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

They identified their photos and glued them on to paper plates.

Recognize a change in the appearance of an object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Adults stapled the 2 paper plates together and……

 

 

 

 

 

 

TA DA! Time to set sail!

 

 

 

 

 

On Thursday the students used corn syrup paint and this to make their art project: Cruise ship template

First, using communication symbols or AAC devices, they identified the color of the paper.

 

 

 

 

 

Identify objects by one observable property, such as color, is a science access point.

 

 

 

Next, they glued their ship DOWN on to the paper.

 

 

 

 

 

Recognize a movement that reflects a spatial relationship is a math access point.

 

 

 

We poured some corn syrup (tinted with blue food coloring) over the paper and the students used their brushes to spread it around the paper.

 

 

 

 

Apply a push to move an object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

TA DA!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Anchors Aweigh!

 

 

 

 

 

LANGUAGE GROUP

This week we asked the students to identify whether a presented item went with a cruise to The Bahamas or Alaska. The adults emphasized that in the Bahamas it’s HOT and in Alaska it’s COLD.  In addition to visual supports we used actual objects or models. The social studies access point associate a picture with a place is addressed in this activity.

Here are some of the questions we asked:

If you went to The Bahamas would you need a parka or a bathing suit?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you went to Alaska would you need a hat to shade your eyes or to keep your ears warm?

Would you see polar bears or parrots in Alaska?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you went to Alaska would you have a snowball fight or play in the sand?

What kind of food would you eat in the Bahamas—-Alaskan salmon or bananas?

 

Our students needed a few prompts in order to correctly identify some of the objects, but they did a pretty great job overall.  We think they’re ready to go on their own cruise!

 

 

 

 

 

 

It was a great start to the school year so join us next time for more fun and learning—-Group by Group!

Don’t forget if you follow us, you HAVE to click on the confirmation email that gets sent to use (and be sure to check your SPAM folder because it sometimes ends up there).

Sharky’s Band

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This was a really fun week! Not only were we excited about our original book, but the whole unit was a blast. To add to the fun, on Thursday it was Take your Child to School Day so we had a couple of extra special guests this week!

 

 

Our sensory groups explored boxes with an aquatic theme. The fine motor groups painted with corn syrup to make their watery art projects and the language group made a “fishy” treat!

 

 

 

 

SENSORY GROUP

Our undersea umbrella is one of our favorites and has a pretty magical feel. We recorded the song “under the sea” from the Little Mermaid on our voice output device which added to the experience!

 

 

 

 

Match living things to their habitats is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

Sharky’s band box featured a cute shark puppet, a lighted sea urchin toy,  and plush crab that made noise when squeezed. Of course, we included some musical instruments such as a ukulele, tambourine, and a colorful wooden noise maker—–this box was lots of fun!

 

The science access point recognize and respond to common sounds can be addressed here.

Here are a few more photos——

 

 

 

 

 

 

————-there was so much to explore!!!

 

 

 

 

 

This box was filled with color! The students molded pink Floam to make their own coral reefs. A sea turtle, fish, and octopus  could be added to the scene.

 

 

 

 

Recognize a model of a real object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

We thought that our kinetic sand was a little like the sandy bottom of the ocean! There were a variety of “fishy” play dough stamps, sea shells, and a starfish  to press into the sand.

 

 

 

 

Apply a push to move an object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

There were 3 ocean themed discovery bottles that were very intriguing to the students—–very eye catching! Various items were in each bottle, including a toy submarine, some toy crabs, plastic fish, and a little toy submarine.

 

 

 

Track objects in motion is a science access point.

We also included some ocean blue pom pom yarn which was  a hit with some of the students 🙂

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The students made waves or practiced writing the letter S in the “ocean foam” shaving cream tray.

 

 

 

 

Recognize that pushing or pulling an object makes it move is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

Our miniature ocean featured some plastic “kelp” strands, a shipwreck, a glowing octopus, and a couple of cute fish. The students found the kelp particularly intriguing!

 

 

 

Recognize a model of a real object is a science access point.

 

 

 

Our little ocean also featured bubbles which were totally giggle producing!

 

 

 

 

 

Track objects in motion is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

Bath and Body Works has an ocean scent so of course we used it this week. Not sure if it actually smells like the ocean but it was pretty popular with the students 🙂

 

 

 

Recognize one or more external body parts is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

FINE MOTOR GROUP

On Tuesday the students made a Sharky picture using this: shark

First, we identified the shape of our paper using communication symbols.

 

 

 

 

Recognize objects with two-dimensional shapes is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

The students squeezed glue to the back of their shark……

 

 

 

 

 

 

…………..and then patted it DOWN on to their paper.

Recognize a movement that reflects a spatial relationship, is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A googlie eye was added. This is an opportunity to work on pincer grasp or index isolation skills.

Match one object to a designated space to show one-to-one correspondence is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Then the students used paint brushes to spread corn syrup (tinted with food coloring) around their paper. When the corn syrup dries it still looks shiny and wet—–very cool!

 

 

 

Recognize that pushing and pulling an object makes it move is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

Some of the students used our adaptive paintbrush made by taping a regular brush to a wooden paint stirrer. While we helped keep the brush stabilized, the students actively moved the paintbrush around.

 

 

 

Again, recognize that pushing and pulling an object makes it move is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

TA DA!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hello Sharky!!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On Wednesday the students colored some pop up cards Ms. Kim gave us—-perfect for our unit!

First the students identified the shape of their cards using communication symbols. They also identified the color of out corn syrup!

Recognize objects with two-dimensional shapes is a math access point.

Identify objects by one observable property, such as color, is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

The students used crayons to color the details of the card.  When needed, adults helped the students differentiate different features and encouraged the use of different colors.

 

 

 

Recognize parts of objects is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

After they had finished coloring, the students added some of the colored corn syrup for a watery feel. They also added a picture of themselves wearing a mask and snorkel—-it looked super cute!

The math access point recognize when an object is added to a situation is addressed here.

 

 

 

 

 

TA DA!!!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Splish splash under the sea!

 

 

 

 

 

 

LANGUAGE GROUP

We made a snack that we think Sharky and his band would really enjoy!  This week, we made an ocean in a cup.  Here’s the recipe we used: Let_s Make An Ocean In A Cup

We started out by putting vanilla pudding mix and milk into a bowl.  Each student got to feel the milk before we poured it in.  They had to indicate on their communication boards whether it was HOT or COLD.

 

 

Recognize objects or materials as hot or cold is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

For the students who put the ingredients in the bowl, they had to first indicate HELP to inform that they wanted to help out.

 

 

 

 

 

Our students are getting better and better at using their communication boards!

 

 

 

 

 

Next, we added some blue food coloring to the ingredients.  Each student got to look in the bowl before we began mixing.  We talked about how it would look DIFFERENT once it was mixed.  The symbol for ‘different’ was modeled by adults.

Recognize a change in the appearance of an object or material is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

Each student got to HELP turn the mixer on.  They had to indicate MORE to inform that more mixing was needed and ALL DONE to indicate that no more mixing was necessary.

 

 

 

 

Solve problems involving small quantities of objects or actions using language, such as enough, too much, or more is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

Next, each student helped crush some graham crackers.  Again, the word DIFFERENT was used to show how the graham crackers looked once they were crushed up.

The science access point recognize a change in the appearance of an object, is addressed here.

 

 

 

 

 

Then we counted out how many cups we needed.  Each student got to have their cup right in front of them.  They each PUT some of the graham cracker “sand” in their cups.

 

 

 

Associate quantities with number names is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

We added 3 spoonfuls of pudding “ocean water” into the cup next, counting each spoonful as they were scooped out.

 

 

 

 

 

Finally, each student got 3 gummy fish.  They had to put each of them in their cup.  This required some prompting since each student wanted to put the fish directly into their mouths 🙂

Done!  It looks like an ocean in a cup but sure doesn’t taste like one 🙂  YUM!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We think we pulled off another great week!

Join us again next time for more fun and learning—–Group by Group!

2018 Winter Olympics

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We stayed in a sports mode this week with our Winter Olympics theme. Our sensory groups explored boxes filled with wintery sports fun. The fine motor groups made olympic themed art projects and the language group hosted our own Winter Olympics!

It was a super fun week and we hope you enjoy seeing all that we did!

 

 

 

 

SENSORY GROUP

Paper shred at the bottom of this box was in the colors of the Korean Flag. We filled it with a variety of winter and olympic themed items including medals and a medal stand. The olympic fanfare was recorded on a voice output device and we even had a mask of the olympic mascot—-a white tiger!

 

 

The science access point recognize a model of a real object can be addressed here.

 

 

 

 

 

This box contained chenille stems in the colors of the olympic flag. The students loved the soft texture of the rings and loved bending them into a variety of shapes—-including circles.

 

 

 

Recognize an object with a two-dimensional shape, is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

We put some gold glitter in our yellow play dough this week. The students used a circle cookie cutter to make their own olympic gold medals!

 

 

 

 

Again, the math access point recognize an object with a two-dimensional shape is addressed.

 

 

 

 

 

Colorful costumes are a feature of the ice skating competitions. The students loved wrapping themselves in the sparkly sequin fabric. They also found the three glittery discovery bottles to be very eye catching!

 

 

 

Track objects moving up and down is a science access point.

 

Did we mention how much they loved the fabric 🙂

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The winter olympics is all about snow so of course we had to have some! Insta Snow is great and really feels pretty close to the real thing! There were 2 different sized scoops—-perfect for making snowmen or snowballs 🙂

 

 

Recognize similarities and differences in size of common objects is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

Red and yellow food coloring was added to shaving cream to make olympic torch flames. The students had fun mixing the colors  and seeing them change to orange as the colors combined!

 

 

 

 

Recognize a change in the appearance of an object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

Bath and BodyWorks peppermint scented the water this week. That icy aroma seemed the perfect choice for a wintery unit. There were some pool noodle olympic rings to match, count, or stack!

 

 

 

Recognize two objects that are the same size or color is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

Matching peppermint lotion was very popular with the students—-whether applied to hands, arms or behind ears 🙂

 

 

 

 

 

Recognize one or more external body parts is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

FINE MOTOR GROUP

On Tuesday, the students made an ice skating themed project using this: ice skaters

First, using communication symbols, they identified the shape of the paper.

 

 

 

 

Recognize objects with two-dimensional shapes such as a rectangle is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

Next, they used blue markers to make skate tracks on the “ice”.

Recognize that pushing and pulling makes an object move is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

They also got to make some skate tracks using our switch operated writing tool—-always fun 🙂

 

 

 

 

 

Distinguish between objects in motion and at rest is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

Then the students glued their ice skater DOWN on the paper—-pat, pat, pat!

Recognize a movement that reflects a spatial relationship, such as up and down, is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ta DA!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Perfect scores!

 

 

 

 

On Wednesday, the students made their own gold medals using paper plates.

First, they identified the shape of plate the using communication symbols.

Recognize objects with two-dimensional shapes is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Then they painted their paper plates with gold paint.

 

 

 

 

 

Recognize that the appearance of an object has changed is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

Pincer grasps were practiced as the students pulled ribbon through a hole in the plate.

 

 

 

Recognize that pushing and pulling an object makes it move is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

TA DA!!!!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Our gold medalists!

 

 

 

 

 

LANGUAGE GROUP

We had lots of fun this week in the language group!  We had our own school Winter Olympics (although the weather made it feel more like it should’ve been the Summer Olympics). All of the elementary classes participated in the events.

We started with a parade led by our very own torch bearer and the host country carrying their flag!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The other classrooms created their own flags and had a flag bearer parade with it through the hall to represent the class.

 

 

 

 

 

 

There were some very colorful flags!

 

 

 

 

 

Our first event was ice skating with ice skaters on switch toys! We had pairs skating, so 2 students got to activate the switches at the same time.

 

 

 

 

We used the ice skater templates from our fine motor group glued  on to pieces of cardboard then attached to the switch toys with velcro.

 

The skaters danced to music from Beauty and the Beast which was recorded on a voice output device.

The switch we used for the boy skater was wireless so we got some super cool twirls which the students (and adults) found quite exciting!

 

 

 

 

 

We had another student who was the score keeper.

He used an All-Turn-It spinner with numbers around it so whatever number it landed on was the score that was received.

There was some controversy with scoring—-not everyone agreed with the judge 🙂

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Next, we had the curling event.  We had 2 students from different classes compete with each other.

They had to push/sweep the ball through the cones to win the game.

 

 

 

They needed a little bit of guidance, but overall they did really well.

 

 

 

 

 

From that event, we went outside for the bobsledding.  The OT’s created some really cool bobsleds out of cardboard boxes that fit over wheelchairs.  We had 2 man bobsled teams: a student and a teacher.

 

 

 

 

Our races consisted of 2 teams at a time.  The teams had to wait to hear “GO” before running to the finish.

 

This event was lots of fun!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Like the dragon boat races we had a few weeks ago, we found out just how competitive our teachers are 🙂

 

 

 

 

 

The final event was the luge.  Our students had to follow directions to keep their bodies on the sleds in order to “luge” down the hill.

 

 

 

 

Although it was a short ride, they had so much fun!

 

 

 

Everybody got to take a turn…..

 

 

…..or two or three 🙂

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Finally, everyone came together for the medals.  Each student received a medal for participating.

 

 

 

 

We took team photos.

 

 

 

 

Everyone agreed…….

 

 

 

 

 

…………. it was a Winter Olympics hit!

 

 

 

Join us again next time for more fun and learning——Group by Group!

 

Macy’s Thanksgiving Parade

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The Macy’s Thanksgiving parade with all those huge balloons inspired us this week! The sensory groups explored boxes related to some of the different balloon characters. The fine motor groups made paper balloons which the language group used for their own version of Macy’s parade.

It was a really fun week!

 

 

 

 

 

SENSORY GROUP

This box contained a variety of things associated with the parade including some shiny mylar balloons which were very eye catching and also made an intriguing crinkly sound. There were toys that represented some of the different balloons, beads, and a little wooly scarf since it can be pretty chilly in NYC this time of year. The real hit was the My Little Pony mask which the students loved admiring themselves in using the Hello Kitty mirror 🙂

Recognize and respond to different types of sensory stimuli is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

The Sinclair dinosaur is one of the favorite balloons in the parade. Our little dinosaurs roamed around some green and purple rice which when pushed aside revealed a picture of Dino at the bottom of the box.

Also, one of the dinosaurs roared when the button on his tummy was pressed.

Recognize a model of a real object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

There were 3 toy characters to find in the  soft pink sand of this Hello Kitty box. The students really liked watching and feeling the fine sand as it fell through the sifter we also included.

 

The math access point associate quantities with number names can be addressed here.

 

 

 

 

These red, yellow, and white pompoms represented Ronald MacDonald and were perfect for sorting and counting.

 

 

Identify objects by one observable property, such as color, is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

We pulled out some of our colorful glittery and gem filled discovery bottles for our Trolls box. We included a voice output device with their theme song “Can’t stop the feeling” and a little toy Troll to dance along to the music.

 

 

 

The science access point track objects moving up and down can be addressed in this activity.

 

 

 

 

Everybody loves the Pillsbury Dough Boy balloon! We used cloud dough for this box—-of course! It is a little messy but has a very cool texture so totally worth the mess. There was a big scoop and small measuring spoon to let the students practice their scooping skills.

 

Solve problems involving small quantities of objects using language, such as enough, too much, or more is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

Hands were rinsed in Sponge Bob’s lagoon. In addition to a Sponge Bob toy there was a measuring cup and sifter scoop for added fun.

 

 

 

 

Recognize similarities and differences in size of objects is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

Because it had a Thanksgiving vibe, we used Bath and BodyWorks cranberry scented to lotion this week. This had a really strong aroma that was a hit with the students!

 

 

Recognize one or move external body parts is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

FINE MOTOR GROUP 

On Tuesday the students made a paper Dino, the Sinclair dinosaur, balloon.

The students took turns using sponge brushes to paint  our great big balloon.

 

 

 

 

 

Recognize the appearance of an object or material has changed is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

After they were finished painting, the students used communication symbols to identify our paint color—–GREEN!

Identify objects by one observable property, such as color, is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

TA DA!

 

 

 

 

 

 

It’s Dino the Dinosaur!

 

 

 

 

On Wednesday the students divided into 2 tables to paint some more balloons!

First the students identified our paint colors using communication symbols.

Identify objects by one observable property is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

We painted Pikachu yellow………..

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

………..and Hello Kitty pink!

Recognize the appearance of an object has changed is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TA DA!!!!

It’s Pikachu!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TA DA!!!!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

It’s Hello Kitty!

 

 

 

 

 

LANGUAGE GROUP

Since we were talking about a parade this week, we decided to have our OWN parade.  This time, instead of having our students dress up, the adults dressed up!

Thank goodness for adult onesies lol.

The adults represented the different balloons in the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We decorated the students’ wheelchairs with garland and some helium balloons.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Since it was a Thanksgiving parade our turkey led the way!

 

 

 

 

 

Our balloons and costumes were VERY eye catching which made for a pretty exciting parade!

 

 

 

 

 

Since the Macy’s parade ends with Santa, we included him too!

He was pretty popular 🙂

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

After we paraded down the halls of the elementary building, we all had some socialization time while enjoying some snacks.

Each student had to request what they wanted from the snack table.  Sentence strips were presented at each different item.  Students had to point to each symbol in the sentence strip in order to get what they wanted.  Some students required hand-over-hand help to point to each symbol.  Our verbal students had to say what they wanted verbally.

If our students chose ice cream, they would have to request the different toppings that were available, again using the sentence strips provided.  To be polite, we had “thank you” symbols out as well.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Of course, we had our makeshift photo booth so everyone could take festive pictures.

There were also lots of props to add to the fun 🙂

 

 

 

A good time was had by all. Join us again next time for more fun and learning——-

Group by Group!

Colonial America

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This week we are looking at life during Colonial times. This theme compliments the Unique Curriculum unit our students are studying this month. Our sensory groups explored boxes related to different aspects of colonial life. The fine motor groups made some colonial themed art projects and the language group made porridge!

 

 

 

 

SENSORY GROUP

We put a lot of different items in this box from farm animals, pictures of historic figures from the time, and even a piece of wood flooring! There was also a discovery bottle with some jacks and dice to represent old time toys. Lots to explore and discover.

Recognize a model of a real object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

A typical breakfast consisted of porridge, which is often made of oatmeal. We haven’t done an oatmeal box in a while so this was the perfect time to bring it out.

The soft oatmeal had a great tactile feel that the students loved as they searched for the letters U-S- A.

 

The science access apply a push to move an object can be addressed here.

 

 

 

 

We found this patriotic pasta on clearance at World Market. The shapes and colors are pretty and perfect for sorting. The box also made a cool noise when shaken. To add to the fun, we put numbers 1 and 3—–for the 13 original colonies!

 

 

The science access point recognize and respond to different types of sensory stimuli can be addressed here.

 

 

 

 

Colonial Americans drank a lot of tea, so we filled this box with tea leaves and a little cup and spoon. There was also a picture of colonial Williamsburg to find at the bottom. The tea had a pretty strong aroma that our students found intriguing and they had lots of fun exploring it.

 

 

Apply a push to move an object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

Puppet shows were a popular form of entertainment back in the day so we thought our students would have fun with this box  of hand puppets. We chose some that represented animals that might be found on colonial farms.

 

 

Recognize one or more external body parts is a science access point that can be addressed here.

They really had a blast with them

—-lots of giggles here 🙂

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For our messy play we went all patriotic—-red and blue glitter in some white oobleck. Total glittery, gooey fun!

 

 

 

 

 

Recognize that pushing and pulling an object makes it move, is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

For our water play we put in a water wheel, which is something that was in use during colonial times. The students were pretty fascinated with it!

 

 

 

 

Recognize one way people use water is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

We used Bath and BodyWorks peach tea scent because tea, apple and peach cider were popular things to drink in colonial america. Everyone loved the peachy scent!

 

 

 

 

Recognize and respond to one type of sensory stimuli is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

FINE MOTOR GROUP

On Tuesday the students made lanterns—-kind of like the ones people used long ago, except ours had battery operated tea lights from Dollar Tree!

We started by identifying the color of our tissue paper using communication symbols, including tactile symbols for our students with visual impairments.

 

Identify objects by one observable property, such as color, is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

The students tore the tissue paper into small pieces. This was a great opportunity to practice bilateral coordination and pre-scissor skills—-and it is totally fun to do 🙂

 

Recognize a change in an object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

Then they put their pieces into a small plastic peanut butter jar.

 

 

 

 

Recognize a movement that reflects a spatial relationship, is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

With the tea light turned on, we closed it up, used chenille stems to make the handle, and…….

 

 

 

TA DA!!!! We made a lantern!

 

 

 

 

 

On Wednesday the students made George Washington puppets using this: George Washington puppet

First we discussed the shape of the paper bag and George’s face.

Recognize an object with two-dimensional shapes is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Then the students used paper cutters and scissors to cut out the  face—-counting the sides, of course!

 

 

 

Recognize the sides of a square is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

The students glued the face and precut hat onto the TOP of a blue paper bag.

 

 

 

 

Recognize a movement that reflects a spatial relationship is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

To finish they pulled apart fiberfil stuffing into TWO pieces and glued it on each side of the face.

Match an object to a designated space to show one-to-one correspondence and associate quantities with number names are math access points.

 

 

 

 

 

TA DA!

 

 

 

 

 

By George, these are some pretty cute puppets!

 

 

 

 

LANGUAGE GROUP

We made some good old fashioned porridge this week in the language group–although we used more advanced technology to heat ours up 🙂

We used this recipe to make our porridge: Let_s Make Colonial Porridge

We started out by measuring the oats using a measuring cup.  Only a little bit at a time was poured in, so our students had to indicate that we needed MORE.  Once we got the correct measurement, we PUT it in a bowl.

Solve problems involving small quantities of objects or actions, using language, such as enough, too much, or more, is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Next, each of our students felt the milk.  They indicated that it felt COLD.  We measured out the milk and POURED it into the bowl.  Then we put it in the microwave to heat it up.

 

 

Recognize objects or materials as warm or cold, is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

While our students waited, they got to play with the oatmeal box from the sensory group.

They seemed to really like the texture!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We had to re-heat the porridge a couple of times, so the students got to pick out their toppings while waiting.  They chose by indicating a picture of what they wanted.  There choices were banana, cinnamon, Greek yogurt, and honey.

Communicate preference for  objects or actions is a language access point.

 

 

 

 

Before the porridge was put in individual bowls, our students got to touch the side of the porridge bowl.  We talked about how it felt WARM.

Recognize objects or materials as warm or cold, is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

We counted out how many bowls we would need.

Associate quantities with number names is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

FINALLY, they got to eat their colonial snack.  YUM!

This was a hit!

 

 

 

 

Thanks again for joining us this week and we also have some exciting news! You may have noticed a new badge on the right side of our page. We were named one of the top 75 Occupational Therapy blogs by Feedspot—–how cool is that!

Join us again next time for more fun and learning——Group by Group!

California

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We are California dreaming this week! Ms. Jen’s vacation to California inspired us to learn more about the Golden State. The sensory groups explored boxes related to facts about California. The fine motor groups made art projects related to state symbols and the language group dressed up like movie stars!

 

 

 

 

 

SENSORY GROUP

This box was of blue and gold paper shred—-California state colors had lots to discover. Many foods are grown there so we put in a variety of plastic fruit and vegetables. We included state symbols such as the grizzly bear, the dog faced butterfly, a discovery bottle with “benitoite”, the state gemstone, and a picture of President Nixon who was born there! We even included some movie star sunglasses 🙂

The science access point recognize a model of a real object can be addressed here.

 

 

 

 

Death Valley is the driest place in North America! We used play sand for this box and added a funnel and small scoop. There was also a map of California to find at the bottom of the box. They had really had fun with this box!

Track objects in motion is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

The oldest operating McDonalds is in California! The students used a letter M cookie cutter to make some “golden arches” in yellow moon sand. There were also a couple of different sized scoops added to the fun.

Recognize a change in an object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

The California gold rush started in 1848 and California is known as the Golden State! This box was filled with a variety of gold items included beads, fabric, and holiday garland. Lots of different textures to touch and explore!

Use senses to recognize objects is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

Sally Ride, the first American women in space, was born in California. For her box, we put a little astronaut and 2 big stars to discover in a box of “outer space” black beans.

Recognize objects as the same is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

We sprinkled blue and yellow glitter into “Pacific Ocean foam” shaving cream this week. As usual, our students had a blast with messy play 🙂

Recognize that pushing and pulling an object makes it move is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

California borders the Pacific Ocean so for our water play we put in some dolphins and sharks—- animals that might be seen swimming along the coast. There were also 2 different sized scoops for added fun!

The science access point recognize a model of a real object and the math access point recognize differences in sizes of containers that hold liquids, can both be addressed with this activity.

 

 

 

 

Bath and BodyWorks ocean scent was perfect for our water play and lotion. The scent was a hit with pretty much every student!

Recognize one or more external body parts is a science access point that can be addressed here.

 

 

 

 

 

FINE MOTOR GROUP

On Tuesday we made some giant redwood trees—-redwoods are the California state tree!

We started by identifying the color green and the number 3.

Identify objects by one observable property, such as color is a science access point.

Associate quantities with number names is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

Next we used paper cutters or switch operated scissors to cut out BIG green triangles counting each side as it as cut.

Recognize that pushing or pulling an object makes it move is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

The triangles were glued to paper towel tubes and——–TaDA!

                                                                          It’s a giant redwood tree!

 

 

 

 

 

 

On Wednesday we made bunches of grapes—-one of California’s largest crops!

We started by identifying the color purple.

Identify objects by one observable property, such as color is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Then the students used a kitchen scrubber to make circles by stamping UP and DOWN onto a piece of paper.

Recognize a movement that reflects a spatial relationship, such as up and down is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

To finish off, we asked the students to identify the number 2. Then they glued 2 leaves onto their bunch of grapes.

Associate quantities with number names, and recognize when an object has been added to a situation are both math access points.

 

 

 

 

 

TA DA!

                                                Some yummy looking grapes!

 

 

 

 

 

LANGUAGE GROUP

This week, instead of making something to eat, we dressed up Hollywood style!

Each of our students got to take a turn pressing the switch to activate an All-Turn-It spinner.  On the spinner we had different things that they can wear: hat, gloves, necklace, sunglasses, and a fur stole.

 

 

 

 

Once our students landed on a picture, they had to indicate where they would wear it.  We had a board with the symbols for “where put” and then symbols for these options: head, hand, neck, eyes.

Recognize one or more external body parts is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

Our students needed some help with indicating the appropriate body part to answer “where”.  They sure knew where to put them when they wore them though!

We had some pretty classy ladies and gents today 🙂

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hope you learned a lot about California this week, we sure did!

Join us again next time for more fun and learning———Group by Group!

Making Our Year Magical

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Because our school is where magic happens every day, Disney was chosen as the school wide theme this year. Of course this is right up our alley and this week we went all out Disney with our activities! Our sensory groups explored boxes related to different characters. The fine motor groups made art projects with a Disney flair and the language group made a yummy treat you can buy when visiting Disney World.

 

 

 

 

SENSORY GROUP

This first box was filled with some Disney character figures, Mickey ears, a Minnie Mouse mirror box, and a magic wand. Lots of things to explore and discover in this box! Of course, the Mickey ears were particularly popular 🙂

The language access point communicate recognition of familiar persons or objects can be addressed with this activity.

 

 

 

 

 

The students had fun pressing Disney images into our Bippity Boppity Boo blue moon sand.

Recognize a change in an object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

Our Prince Charming rice box contained some plastic knights in 2 different colors to match and sort. There was also a little horse and a picture of the prince to find at the bottom of the box.

Recognize 2 objects that are identical to each other is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

We put 2 stretchy toys to let the students practice being strong like Hercules! There was a soft starchy dog and a stretchy bug also vibrated when pulled apart——eliciting lots of giggles 🙂

Recognize that pushing or pulling an object makes it move is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

Our Tinker Bell light box was a huge hit and very entrancing to the students. There were 3 strands of battery operated lights in the box so it REALLY eye catching!

Recognize a source of light is a science access point.

Pretty darn magical——–

                                           if we do say so ourselves 🙂

 

 

 

 

The fairy dust discovery bottles were also very intriguing to the students. They loved watching the glitter swirling around. Both shaking and rolling the bottles produced similar results.

Track objects in motion is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

We put some fluorescent paint into our oobleck to make it MAGICAL this week. It really looked pretty awesome under the black light. We also added a little glitter for some extra sparkle!

Recognize that pushing or pulling an object makes it move is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

Hands were rinsed in Ariel’s mermaid lagoon! Along with a little mermaid toy, we put in a measuring cup for scooping fun.

The math access point recognize differences in sizes of containers that hold liquids can be addressed with this activity.

 

 

 

 

 

Our scent for the water play and lotion this week was Bath and BodyWorks One Thousand Wishes. We are not sure exactly what a thousand wishes smells like but the name kind of fit with our theme so— we went with it 🙂

Recognize one or more external body parts is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

FINE MOTOR GROUP

On Tuesday we made some Mickey Mouse ears using paper plates!

First we identified our paint color using communication symbols.

Identify objects by one observable property, such as color, is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Then we counted our paper plates and identified the number 2.

Associate quantities with number names is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Since we had two ears there was a lot of painting needed for this project, so we decided to use sponge brushes to get greater coverage.

Recognize a change in an object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

We finished by stapling the “ears” onto  black paper plates (bought at the dollar store) with the center section cut out.

M I C —– K E Y

                                                           M O U S E!!!!

 

 

 

 

 

On Wednesday we made some magic wands!

The students got to choose a craft foam star and then identified the color using communication symbols.

Identify objects by one observable property, such as color, is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

Then the students decorated their stars using an assortment of stickers and putting them DOWN onto their stars.Peeling the backing off those stickers is a great way to practice pincer grasp skills!

Recognize a movement that reflects a spatial relationship such as up or down is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

TA DA!!!

                                           We going to make it a magical year!

 

 

 

 

 

LANGUAGE GROUP

This week, we made a cool treat that is actually sold in Disney World–a Pineapple Whip.  Here is the recipe that we followed: Let_s Make a Disney World Pineapple Whip!

We started by pouring in a small can of pineapple juice followed by 3 tbsp of honey.  We asked our students what we would use to measure out the honey: a tablespoon or a measuring cup.

Recognize differences in containers that hold liquids is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

We then added some frozen pineapple.  Each student got to feel the bag.  They conveyed whether it felt HOT or COLD.  Recognize the temperature of items, such as food, as cool or warm is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

Then we added the pineapple and some Cool Whip topping.

The math access point recognize when an object is added to a situation is addressed here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Our students then had to turn on the food processor using a switch.  Since it was a little runnier than it was supposed to be, we added some ice.

Observe and recognize a predictable cause-effect relationship related to a science topic is a science access point that can be addressed here.

 

 

 

 

 

Once it was all blended and smooth, we counted out cups for each of our students——-7 cups for 7 students! Each student had to request a cup of Pineapple Whip and also a spoon if they wanted one.

                                                          YUMMMM!!!

The language access point adjust body movement or nonverbal expression with prompting as necessary to communicate wants and needs is addressed here.

 

 

 

 

This year truly is going to be magical!

Join us next time for more fun and learning——-Group by Group!