Tag Archives: voice output device

Holiday Characters

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For a final theme of the year we chose Holiday Characters—–seen everywhere this time of year! Our sensory groups explored boxes dedicated to different characters. The fine motor groups made character themed ornaments and the language group made a fun holiday themed treat.

 

 

 

 

SENSORY GROUP

Our first box contained a variety of holiday character toys including Nutcrackers, polar bears, SugarPlum fairies, and elves. Some of the toys made noise, either by squeezing or crinkling which added to the fun. The lighted elf wand and Santa hat were big hits—–hohoho.

 

Recognize and respond to different types of sensory stimuli is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

This first box is not exactly a holiday character but since lights are EVERYWHERE this time of year they almost are 🙂

 

 

 

 

Our students always love our light boxes and this colorful one was no exception.

It was very eye catching!

 

 

 

 

 

Recognize a source of light is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

The students had fun making their own Grinch character using green Floam, a plastic Grinch face, and some Mr. Potato head hands. Pretty darn cute!

 

 

 

Recognize one or more external body parts is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

The Coca Cola polar bear is often seen on TV this time of year so we thought a box of Insta Snow was perfect for this character. There was a picture of polar bears to find at the bottom of the box and we put in a spoon, scoop and a little penguin friend for our students to play with. Insta Snow feels cool like the real stuff and was lots of fun to explore.

Solve problems involving quantities of objects or actions using language, such as enough, too much, or more is a math access point that can be addressed here.

 

 

 

 

The Nutcracker ballet is a must see for many people. Our ballet themed winter umbrella was pretty magical, especially when twirled around! Music from the ballet was recorded on a voice output device.

 

 

 

Track objects in motion is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

We made some delicious smelling gingerbread playdough this week. While definitely NOT yummy tasting like real gingerbread, it was still lots of fun to play with using our cute cookie cutter.

 

 

 

Apply a push to move an object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

We found a package of craft foam holiday symbols such as presents, hats, lights, trees in a dollar store and decided they were perfect for water play. The students used a measuring cup and sifter to scoop up and rinse the different shapes. They also adhered to the sides of the tub which was pretty cool!

The science access point match objects by an observable property, such as shape, can be addressed here.

 

 

 

 

Our scent this week was  sugarplum swirl by Bath and BodyWorks. Our students really liked it and left the group smelling like yummy little sugarplums 🙂

 

 

Recognize one or more external body parts is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

FINE MOTOR GROUP

On Tuesday the students made snowflake ornaments.

First, we identified a circle using communication symbols. For our visually impaired students we used textured symbols.

 

 

 

Recognize objects with two-dimensional shapes, such as a circle is a math access point.

 

 

 

Next, they were helped to squeeze a hole puncher, making a CIRCLE shaped hole in the snowflake.

 

 

 

Recognize a change in an object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

Then they glued a CIRCLE shaped photo of themselves onto the snowflake.

Again, recognize objects with two-dimensional shapes is addressed.

 

 

 

 

 

The students helped pull a chenille stem through the small hole.

Recognize that pushing and pulling an object makes it move is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TA DA!!!!

 

 

 

 

 

Sammy and Suzi Snowflakes!

 

 

 

 

On Wednesday the students made gingerbread man ornaments.

First, using communication symbols,  they let us know how many buttons they wanted to put on their gingerbread man.

Associate quantities with number names is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

Next the students used a hole punch to punch a hole in their ornament. Most of the students needed help with this but some of them could do it independently!

 

 

Apply a push to move an object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

Then they glued their faces and buttons onto their ornaments—–great pincer grasp practice!

Match one object to a designated space to show one-to-one correspondence is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The students helped pull a chenille stem through the small hole.

Recognize that pushing and pulling an object makes it move is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TA Da!!!

 

 

 

 

 

Cute little gingerbread people!!!

 

 

 

 

 

LANGUAGE GROUP

Well, the weather turned downright COLD for our language group so maybe hot chocolate would’ve been a better choice, but we went with our Grinch smoothies instead.  Here is the recipe we used: Let’s Make a Grinch Smoothie

We started out by measuring our orange juice.  We talked about how we had to use a measuring cup rather than measuring spoons since we had to measure out 1 cup.  We had a volunteer who poured it into the blender.

Next, we added some spinach.  We need our Grinch smoothie to be GREEN!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Then we got out the frozen mixed fruit.  Everyone had a chance to touch the bag.  They then had to indicate if it felt COLD or HOT.

 

 

 

Recognize an item as warm or cold is a science access point.

 

 

 

We added the frozen fruit to the blender.

Finally, we added some agave nectar.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Since we always taste test the lemon juice when we use it, we decided to taste test the agave.  We think some of our students thought we were trying to trick them with the lemon juice because they were a little hesitant to open their mouths at first 🙂

 

 

We just put a bit on their lips, though, and they could tell that it was sweet.

 

 

 

 

Everyone got a chance to turn on the blender so the ingredients could be mixed up.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We counted out how many students were in the room and poured the Grinch smoothies into our Grinch cups.

Cara traced Grinch faces onto our cups!

 

 

 

 

The students were intrigued once they tasted it they gave it a big thumbs up!

YUM!

 

 

 

What a fun filled week we had! Our very own little holiday characters will be on winter break for a couple of weeks. Join us again in January for more fun and learning——Group by Group.

 Happy Holidays!

Macy’s Thanksgiving Parade

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The Macy’s Thanksgiving parade with all those huge balloons inspired us this week! The sensory groups explored boxes related to some of the different balloon characters. The fine motor groups made paper balloons which the language group used for their own version of Macy’s parade.

It was a really fun week!

 

 

 

 

 

SENSORY GROUP

This box contained a variety of things associated with the parade including some shiny mylar balloons which were very eye catching and also made an intriguing crinkly sound. There were toys that represented some of the different balloons, beads, and a little wooly scarf since it can be pretty chilly in NYC this time of year. The real hit was the My Little Pony mask which the students loved admiring themselves in using the Hello Kitty mirror 🙂

Recognize and respond to different types of sensory stimuli is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

The Sinclair dinosaur is one of the favorite balloons in the parade. Our little dinosaurs roamed around some green and purple rice which when pushed aside revealed a picture of Dino at the bottom of the box.

Also, one of the dinosaurs roared when the button on his tummy was pressed.

Recognize a model of a real object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

There were 3 toy characters to find in the  soft pink sand of this Hello Kitty box. The students really liked watching and feeling the fine sand as it fell through the sifter we also included.

 

The math access point associate quantities with number names can be addressed here.

 

 

 

 

These red, yellow, and white pompoms represented Ronald MacDonald and were perfect for sorting and counting.

 

 

Identify objects by one observable property, such as color, is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

We pulled out some of our colorful glittery and gem filled discovery bottles for our Trolls box. We included a voice output device with their theme song “Can’t stop the feeling” and a little toy Troll to dance along to the music.

 

 

 

The science access point track objects moving up and down can be addressed in this activity.

 

 

 

 

Everybody loves the Pillsbury Dough Boy balloon! We used cloud dough for this box—-of course! It is a little messy but has a very cool texture so totally worth the mess. There was a big scoop and small measuring spoon to let the students practice their scooping skills.

 

Solve problems involving small quantities of objects using language, such as enough, too much, or more is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

Hands were rinsed in Sponge Bob’s lagoon. In addition to a Sponge Bob toy there was a measuring cup and sifter scoop for added fun.

 

 

 

 

Recognize similarities and differences in size of objects is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

Because it had a Thanksgiving vibe, we used Bath and BodyWorks cranberry scented to lotion this week. This had a really strong aroma that was a hit with the students!

 

 

Recognize one or move external body parts is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

FINE MOTOR GROUP 

On Tuesday the students made a paper Dino, the Sinclair dinosaur, balloon.

The students took turns using sponge brushes to paint  our great big balloon.

 

 

 

 

 

Recognize the appearance of an object or material has changed is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

After they were finished painting, the students used communication symbols to identify our paint color—–GREEN!

Identify objects by one observable property, such as color, is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

TA DA!

 

 

 

 

 

 

It’s Dino the Dinosaur!

 

 

 

 

On Wednesday the students divided into 2 tables to paint some more balloons!

First the students identified our paint colors using communication symbols.

Identify objects by one observable property is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

We painted Pikachu yellow………..

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

………..and Hello Kitty pink!

Recognize the appearance of an object has changed is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TA DA!!!!

It’s Pikachu!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TA DA!!!!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

It’s Hello Kitty!

 

 

 

 

 

LANGUAGE GROUP

Since we were talking about a parade this week, we decided to have our OWN parade.  This time, instead of having our students dress up, the adults dressed up!

Thank goodness for adult onesies lol.

The adults represented the different balloons in the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We decorated the students’ wheelchairs with garland and some helium balloons.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Since it was a Thanksgiving parade our turkey led the way!

 

 

 

 

 

Our balloons and costumes were VERY eye catching which made for a pretty exciting parade!

 

 

 

 

 

Since the Macy’s parade ends with Santa, we included him too!

He was pretty popular 🙂

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

After we paraded down the halls of the elementary building, we all had some socialization time while enjoying some snacks.

Each student had to request what they wanted from the snack table.  Sentence strips were presented at each different item.  Students had to point to each symbol in the sentence strip in order to get what they wanted.  Some students required hand-over-hand help to point to each symbol.  Our verbal students had to say what they wanted verbally.

If our students chose ice cream, they would have to request the different toppings that were available, again using the sentence strips provided.  To be polite, we had “thank you” symbols out as well.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Of course, we had our makeshift photo booth so everyone could take festive pictures.

There were also lots of props to add to the fun 🙂

 

 

 

A good time was had by all. Join us again next time for more fun and learning——-

Group by Group!

Day of the Dead

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We had fun learning about Day of the Dead this week. It is a holiday celebrated November 1st and 2nd in Mexico. Our sensory groups explored boxes related to different facts about the holiday. The fine motor groups and language group made art projects inspired by sugar skulls!

 

 

 

 

 

SENSORY GROUP

The students sorted pompoms in the colors of the Mexican flag—–red, green, and white.

 

 

 

Identify objects by one observable property, such as color, is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

These eye catching beans reminded us of all the colorful decorations and costumes seen in pictures of Day of the Dead celebrations.

The students searched for letter D’s of different sizes or watched them sift through fingers.

 

Recognize differences in size of objects is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

This box had different items related to Day of the Dead. We put in some toy people and the word FAMILY since the holiday is all about ancestors. There were also some flower petals, beads, skeletons, and musical instruments—-including a maraca that named colors and numbers in Spanish when shaken!

Recognize a model of a real object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

Salt, representing the “salt of life”, is also a part of the celebration. In this box we put salt and some tools the students could use to explore it. There was also a picture of a calaveras or sugar skull to find underneath.

 

 

Recognize that pushing and pulling an object makes it move, is a science access point. Track objects in motion is another science access point that can be addressed here.

 

 

 

 

Lots of candles are placed on altars during the Day of the Dead. Since we can’t use real candles at school, we used our Wikki Stix and some light toys to simulate them.

The students really had a lot of fun with this box!

 

Some of the students preferred the Wikki Stix…….

but the lighted toys were also a big hit of course!

 

 

 

 

 

Recognize a source of light is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

Colorful flowers are seen everywhere during Day of the Dead celebrations. Our students used a flower shaped cookie cutter with red and yellow play dough to decorate this eye catching sugar skull tray we found at the Dollar General store.

Apply a push to move an object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

There were some fun lighted flowers to look at in our water basin this week. We also included some different sized scoops.

 

 

 

 

Recognize differences in containers that hold liquids is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

Bath and BodyWorks vanilla sugar was the perfect scent for us this week. This sweet scent is always popular with the students—-whether rubbed on hands, arms, or behind ears!

 

Recognize one or more external body parts is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

FINE MOTOR GROUP

On Tuesday the students decorated a sugar skull picture we found on the Coloring Castle website.

We also used some stampers we made using dish scrubbers and craft foam flowers.

 

First the students chose which color paint to start, either RED or YELLOW, using communication symbols.

Identify objects by one observable property, such as color, is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

We applied the paint to the stampers and encouraged the students to stamp UP and DOWN, helping them as needed.

 

 

Recognize a movement that reflects a spatial relationship is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

Ta Da!!!!!

 

 

 

 

                                                         Check out our sugar skulls!

 

 

 

 

 

On Wednesday the students decorated these huge felt sugar skulls we found at the Dollar Tree store. Since they were one dollar a piece it was a little bit of a splurge for us but we couldn’t resist!

First, using communication symbols, the students identified the colors of the glitter we planned to use.

Identify objects by one observable property, such as color, is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Then the students painted their skulls with glue.

Apply a push to move an object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Time to “shake, shake, shake that glitter”!

The science access point recognize an action as fast or slow, can be addressed here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Next they glued some silk flowers onto their skulls. After each flower was glued down we asked the students if they were “all done” or wanted “more”. Of course, we also counted how many flowers each student put on their skull.

 

 

Associate quantities with number names is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

Ta DA!!!!!!

 

 

 

 

 

                                     Such colorful calaveras!

 

 

 

 

 

 

LANGUAGE GROUP

We put our own spin on edible calaveras this week and made our version of sugar skulls.  Here’s the recipe: Lets Make Our Version Of Sugar Skulls

We started out by pouring some milk into a small cup and then made it edible paint by adding food coloring.  Our students got to STIR the food coloring around and watched as it turned our white milk different colors.

Recognize a change in an object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

Once the “paint” was all mixed up, we counted out how many plates and pieces of bread we needed for all of our friends. Each student got to paint a piece of bread, requesting the colors they wanted using communication boards.

Identify objects by one observable property, such as color, is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

After they finished painting their bread, we started to make the face.  We had to count out 2 banana slices for the eyes.  We talked about how the eyes had to go on the TOP of the bread.  Then we counted out 2 blueberries to put on TOP of the banana slices.

 

 

 

 

Next, we added the nose.  Each student got 1 half of a strawberry.  We talked about how the strawberry goes in the MIDDLE of the bread.

Recognize one or more external body parts is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Finally, we used 5 miniature marshmallows for the teeth.  Students had to indicate that they needed MORE marshmallows if they did not receive the correct amount.  We talked about how the marshmallows go on the BOTTOM of the bread.

Associate quantities with number names and identify spatial relationships, are both math access points.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wow!!  These turned out great and were lots of fun to make.

                     Pretty tasty too!

 

 

 

We enjoyed learning about Dia de los Muertos this week and hope you did too.

Join us again next time for more fun and learning——Group by Group!

Monsters in Movies

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We had so much fun with this unit! Our book is awesome and the students had a great time dressing up as different characters so be sure to check it out. Our sensory groups explored boxes related to different movie monsters. The fine motor groups made some monster art projects and the language group conducted some monster experiments!

 

 

 

 

SENSORY GROUP

To set the mood, we turned off the lights and brought out our Hotel Transylvania umbrella. It had orange lights, ghostly garland, and some little bats. The students loved it!

 

 

 

The science access point recognize a model of a real object can be addressed here

 

 

 

 

We filled this “monster” box of black and red paper shred with figures, finger puppets, a plush Scooby Doo, and a great BIG squeaky rat! The students rocked out to The Monster Mash recorded on a voice output device. Lots of things to look at, touch, listen to, and explore!

 

Recognize and respond to different types of sensory stimuli is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

For our Frankenstein box we used green Floam and then added Mr. Potato Head pieces and some laminated props we made. The students came up with some monstrously  cool creations!

 

Recognize one or more external body parts is a science access point that can be addressed here.

 

 

 

 

Bubber is a great molding substance, perfect for making Scooby snacks! The students could use the bone shaped cookie cutter or just mold the Bubber into whatever shapes they liked.

 

 

 

Apply a push to move an object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

The character Mal, from The Descendants, has purple hair. We decided our purple kinetic sand would be PERFECT for this box. We included a heart shaped scoop that could be used for a mold and a little rake. Whether pushing and pulling to make it move or just watching it drip back down into the box—–this stuff is always a favorite!Recognize that pushing and pulling an object makes it move is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

The students used pieces cut from black craft foam to turn shaving foam into ghosts. Messy fun as usual.

 

 

 

 

Track the movement of objects that are pushed or pulled is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

Our caribbean pirate lagoon contained a shipwreck and a couple of ducky pirates. There were also 2 different size scoops for added fun.

 

 

 

Recognize differences in sizes of containers that hold liquids is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

We thought that Bath and BodyWorks twilight woods scent would be the perfect complement to our unit this week. They really loved the scent!

 

 

 

Recognize and respond to one type of sensory stimuli is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

FINE MOTOR GROUP

On Tuesday the students made some monster masks using this: monster mask

We asked the students to choose which marker they wanted to use first. We took a cue from the colors of Sully from Monsters Inc. and used the colors BLUE and PURPLE.

Identify objects by one observable property, such as color, is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

Some of our students used the writer we made using a switch operated vibrating toy, others decorated their masks old school—-with markers 🙂

 

 

 

Recognize a change in an object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

TA DA!

 

 

 

 

 

                                                      Such cute little monsters!

 

 

 

 

 

On Wednesday we made some paper bag mummies! We found the idea on Pinterest.

First the students identified the color of our marker using communication symbols.

Match objects by one observable property, such as color, is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We asked the students to use their black markers to draw ACROSS lines on the bag. Then they glued a strip of torn black paper at the TOP of the bag.

Recognize a movement that reflects a spatial relationship, is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

Next we squeezed 2 glue dots on the black piece of paper and asked the students to put a googlie eye on each dot.

Associate quantities with number names is a math access point. Match one object to a designated space to show one-to-one correspondence is also a math access point.

 

 

 

 

Ta DA!!!

 

 

 

 

 

                                                    It’s a Mummy Monster Mash!

 

 

 

 

 

LANGUAGE GROUP

This week, instead of making yummy treats, we put together some pretty awesome monster experiments.  Here are the ones that we used with the directions: Let_s Do Monster Experiments!

Since the pumpkin was cut beforehand, we had the innards of the pumpkin in a bag.  We passed it around so our students could feel what the insides of pumpkins are like. Since it had been in the fridge it also felt COLD.

Recognize objects or materials as warm or cold, is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

We started out by making an Erupting Pumpkin.  First, we put some baking soda in a small bowl.

Next, we added some dish soap to the bowl.

Recognize when an object is added to a situation, is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

Our students voted between 2 different colors of food coloring.  The choice was a tie, so Grandma had to break it by voting for PINK.  We added the food coloring and some glitter.

Compare quantities to 3 using language, such as more, less, or the same, is math access point. Communicate preference for familiar objects or actions is a language access point.

 

 

 

 

 

We put the bowl in a carved out pumpkin (thank you to Cara’s son and daughter for creating the faces for the pumpkin).  We poured some vinegar in it and watched it erupt!

WAY COOL!!!!!

 

 

 

 

 

For our next experiment, we made some Monster Slime.

We started by putting 1/2 cup of glue in a bowl.  Then we added 1/2 cup of water to the glue.

We put in some slimy green food coloring and, of course, some glitter!  We made sure to stir it up really well.  We talked about how it was thin and watery.

Solve simple problems involving joining small quantities of objects is a math access point

 

 

 

 

 

Then we added the liquid starch.  When we began stirring it around, it almost instantly started firming up.  We transferred it to a plate so the students could see how it changed to a solid.

 

 

Recognize a change in an object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

We added some googly eyes and voila!  Monster slime!

 

 

 

 

There were mixed reactions about it all around 🙂

 

 

 

 

 

Last, we made an Expanding Ghost.

We put some vinegar into an empty water bottle.  Then we put some baking soda into a balloon that had a ghost face on it.

Again, the math access point recognize when an object is added to a situation, is addressed.

 

 

 

 

We secured the balloon over the top of the bottle and then turned the balloon over so that the baking soda fell into the bottle.

WOW!!  The balloon got bigger as the reaction happened in the bottle.  Our students also got to feel the bottle which was COLD from the reaction.

So much spooky fun!

 

 

 

We had a MONSTER good time this week! Join us again next time for more fun and learning——-Group by Group!

 

We Love Charlie Brown!

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The comic strip Peanuts first ran on October 2, 1950. So, this week it is all about Charlie Brown and his friends!  The sensory groups explored boxes related to some of the different characters in the comic strip. The fine motor groups made some colorful art projects and the language group made a Peanuts inspired treat.

 

 

 

 

SENSORY GROUP

We used plastic pine needles, a nod to the Charlie Brown Christmas special,  as the base of this box. Then we added some of the cartoon characters, a small Linus blanket, a laminated comic strip, a Great Pumpkin, and a voice output device with the theme song recorded on it!

 

Identify characters in a story is a language access point.

 

The Joe Cool sunglasses were a hit……

our students always rock a pair of sunglasses 🙂

 

 

 

 

 

This box contained chenille stems in the colors of Charlie Brown’s shirt. The students could bend them like the zig zags in his shirt.

Recognize a change in an object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

In Snoopy’s box we put in some white Floam that the students could shape into clouds for a little laminated Red Baron to fly around in!

Recognize that the appearance of an object is a science access point that can be addressed here.

 

 

 

 

 

Linus’ blanket is SOFT and Schroeder’s piano is HARD. There were a variety of hard and soft items to compare and contrast in this box.

Match objects with similar observable properties, such as size, shape, color, or texture, is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

This box was dedicated to PigPen. We usually use coffee ground for anything that calls for dirt or soil but we had a little money to spend and bought this awesome clean play dirt from Beyond Play. This stuff is really cool and a lot like kinetic sand—-so you know we love it! We added some fun digging tools and a letter P cookie cutter. There was also a picture of the Peanuts characters to find at the bottom of the box.

Recognize that pushing and pulling an object makes it move is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

Everyone loves Charlie Brown’s Great Pumpkin tv special so we chose pumpkin puree for our messy play this week. YES, we have done this before and it is truly messy but definitely a  different texture for the students to explore.  Some of the students loved it—–others not so much 🙂 There was also a laminated pumpkin to decorate with the orange goo.

Apply a push to move an object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

There were different sized letter P’s to scoop up in our water play this week. For scooping we included a measuring cup and sieve shovel.

Recognize differences is sizes of containers that hold liquids is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

Peppermint swirl from Bath and BodyWorks was the perfect scent for our lotion and water play. This was a really strong scent that really permeated the whole room! We definitely think Peppermint Patty would approve.

Recognize one or more external body parts.

 

 

 

 

 

FINE MOTOR GROUP

On Tuesday we borrowed an idea from http://whereimaginationgrows.com, it even came with the free printable silhouette we used—–how cool is that!

First we used communication symbols to identify the color of our paint this week.

Identify objects by one observable property, such as color, is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We watered down the paint a little bit to make it easier to spread and then the students started painting their sunsets.

 

 

 

Recognize that pushing and pulling an object makes it move is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

After they had finished painting, we helped the students glue down their silhouettes since copier paper was a little flimsy.

Recognize a change in a object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TA DA!

 

 

 

 

Charlie Brown and Snoopy—–best friends forever!

 

 

 

 

 

On Wednesday we were inspired by the Great Pumpkin and made our own pumpkin Patch!

First identified the color of our pumpkins using communication symbols.

Identify objects by one observable property, such as color, is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Then the students used a switch operated LadyBug marker to make leaves and vines on  the background. It was a true group effort and the students had a blast!!!!

 

 

 

 

Share objects with a partner is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

We put the poster up on the table and gave the students regular green markers to finish make even more vines.

Recognize a change in an object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

Each student then planted a big craft foam pumpkin on to the poster by gluing it DOWN.

 

 

 

 

Recognize a movement that reflects a spatial relationship, such as up and down, is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

TA DA!

We are ready for the Great Pumpkin!

 

 

 

 

 

 

LANGUAGE GROUP

This week we made a yummy treat that we think the crew of Peanuts would enjoy.  Here is the recipe we used: Let_s Make The Great Pumpkin Mousse!

We started by putting the vanilla pudding mix and some cinnamon into a bowl.  We smelled the cinnamon and talked about how it smelled sweet.

 

 

Recognize and respond to different types of stimuli is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

Next, we put a can of evaporated milk into the bowl.  Our students had to request if they wanted to help turn on the mixer.  We talked about if we were DONE mixing or if we needed to mix it MORE.

 

 

Solve problems involving small quantities of objects or actions using language, such as enough, too much, or more, is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

After it was all mixed up, we put the pumpkin puree in.  We observed how the color changed from yellow to orange.

Recognize a change in an object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Then we added some whipped cream next and stirred it all up.

Recognize that pushing and pulling an object makes it move, is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We counted out the number of students and divvied up the pumpkin mousse.  We topped it with some more whipped cream and a bit of cinnamon and got down to the fun part—–TASTING!

After the students ate their pudding, they used communication symbols to tell us if they liked it or not.  The verdict was YUM!!!!

 

 

 

Thanks for joining us and come back again for more fun and learning——Group by Group!

Johnny Appleseed

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Johnny Appleseed Day is September 26 so we decided to learn a little more about him this week! Our sensory groups explored boxes that were all about apples. The fine motor groups made apple themed art projects and the language group made a yummy apple snack.

 

 

 

 

 

 

SENSORY GROUP

We turned one of our umbrellas into an apple tree this week and it was a total hit with the students! There were 3 different apples to find and a voice output with the song “Don’t sit under the apple tree with anyone else but me”—–an oldie but a goodie!

The math access point associate quantities with number names can be addressed here.

 

 

 

 

As we said, this umbrella tree really captured the students’ attention.

So we couldn’t resist adding a few more super cute photos 🙂

 

 

 

 

 

 

A is for APPLE——the students searched  for letter A’s in green rice with black bean “apple seeds”. There was also a map of his home state to find at the bottom of the box.

Identify objects by observable properties, such as shape, is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

Apples come in lots of different colors but mostly RED, YELLOW, or GREEN. In this box the students sorted colorful “apple” pompoms into matching plates.

The science access point identify objects by one observable property, such as color, and the math access point recognize objects with three-dimensional objects, such as balls (spheres) can be addressed here.

 

 

 

 

 

The students used apple shaped cookie cutters to make BIG and LITTLE apples in red moon sand. We didn’t actually have apple cookie cutters so we used the pumpkin cutters we had on hand since they are a pretty similar shape—–sometimes you just have to make do with what you have 🙂

 

Recognize similarities and differences in size of common objects is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

Apple seeds are kind of black and brown so we thought these small beans would work as a nice stand in for them. There was a little dish to fill and a measuring spoon for fun scooping practice.

 

 

The math access point recognize when an object or person is added to or is taken away from a situation, can be addressed here.

 

 

 

 

 

We added some green food coloring to shaving cream this week. We encouraged the students to draw apple shaped circles or straight line stems.

Recognize objects with two-dimensional shapes is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

Hands were rinsed in apple scented water with a floating plastic apple, watering can, scoop, and an apple shaped sponge. Lots of different things to interact with here and the students had a blast.

The math access point recognize differences in sizes of containers that hold liquids, can be addressed here.

 

 

 

 

The watering can was especially fun and

the students were fascinated by the streaming water!

 

 

 

 

 

Our apple scent this week was country apple from Bath and BodyWorks.

It was a pretty yummy scent that left our students smelling like delicious little apples 🙂

Recognize one or more external body parts is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FINE MOTOR GROUP

On ‘Tuesday we made apples using this template: apple

We started by identifying the color of our paper shred.

Identify objects by one observable property, such as color, is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Next the students painted glue (watered down a little bit to make it easier to spread) with a sponge brush.

Recognize that pushing and pulling an object makes it move, is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Then came the fun part—–dropping handfuls of paper shred onto their apples! They really liked this part.

Recognize a change in an object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

A little green leaf was added and ………..Ta DA!

                                                                   Just delicious!

 

 

 

 

 

On Wednesday the students made apple trees. We used green plates from the Dollar Tree (a whole stack for $1, how can you beat that!) and leftover corrugated cardboard for the tree trunks. This was a really cheap craft—–and we like that 🙂

First the students identified the shape of the plates and the color of our “apple” pompoms

Recognize an object with a two-dimensional shape such as a circle, is a math access point.

 

The science access point identify objects by one observable property, such as color, is addressed here.

 

 

 

 

Then they practiced eye hand coordination skills by dipping red pompoms into glue and then gluing them onto their “trees”. Of course, we counted the number of apples on each tree!

 

The math access points recognize when an object is added to a situation and associate quantities with number names, can be addressed here.

 

 

 

 

 

Ta Da!

 

 

 

 

                                                        Look at our apple orchard!

 

 

 

 

LANGUAGE GROUP

This week we made our own applesauce!  We also learned a lot about patience since the food processor was acting up a bit during group.  Here is a link to the recipe we used: Let_s Make Cinnamon Applesauce

We started out by peeling the apples.  We got to use an apple peeler which was pretty cool to our students.  They helped us turn the handle to make the peeler work.

 

 

 

We found that the peeler also cored AND cut the apple so we got to skip that step 🙂

Recognize a change in an object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

We checked out the string of apple peel!

Some of the students thought it was pretty fascinating but others weren’t quite so sure about it.

 

 

 

 

Next, we had to add some lemon juice.  Each of our students got to try a little taste of the lemon juice.  We talked about how it tasted SOUR.

 

 

Then we added some lemon juice to the food processor.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Our students helped turn the food processor on.  We found that we had to add a little bit of water to help get the mixture going.

Recognize a way to stop an object from moving is a science access point that can be addressed here.

 

 

 

 

 

We poured the mixture into a bowl.  Next, we added some sugar and cinnamon.  Our students smelled the cinnamon and we talked about how it smelled sweet.

We stirred everything up and voila!  No-cook applesauce!

 

The math access point solve problems involving quantities of objects or actions using language, such as enough, too much, or more, can be addressed here.

 

 

 

 

Yummy deliciousness

this was a hit 🙂

 

 

 

Hope you enjoyed learning a little bit about Johnny Appleseed.

Join us again next time for more fun and learning——Group by Group!

What Teachers Do For Fun!

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Our staff are such a fun loving group that we decided to showcase them for our first theme of the year! We thought our students would also get a kick out of seeing the adults around them being a little goofy 🙂 The sensory, fine motor, and language groups this week were all related to the different ways the staff have fun!

So, welcome back to school and let the fun and learning begin!

 

 

 

SENSORY GROUP

Every time we have an event at school, someone dresses up as Hootie the Owl—-our school mascot. For Hootie we put a little owl and the letters O-W-L in a box filled with birdseed. We don’t use birdseed a lot but it has a really cool feel that our students really loved exploring.

The science access point recognize common objects in the environment is addressed here.

 

 

 

 

Digging holes on a sandy beach is a fun way to spend an afternoon! Our little beach contains kinetic sand which is always a lot of fun especially with the little shovel and rake we put in this box.

Recognize that pushing and pulling an object makes it move is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

Playing with their dogs is another way some of our teachers have fun. The students used a dog shaped cookie cutter to cut out some green play dough puppies. We chose the unusual color because it’s Ms. Robin’s favorite color and she gave us her picture for our book 🙂

The science access point apply a push to move an object is addressed here. The math access point associate quantities with number names can also be addressed.

 

 

 

 

Our annual Talent Contest is always a hit with both students and staff showing off their talents! The Dancing Divas were totally fun and this box contained some props and voice output device with recorded music letting the students channel their own inner divas!

Recognize and respond to different types of sensory stimuli is a science access point that can be addressed here.

 

 

 

 


Joy got to hang out with some Norwegian mountain trolls last summer—-how cool is that! In this box, 3 laminated trolls were added to climb around or hide in our grey Floam mountain.

The math access point associate quantities with number names can be addressed here.

 

 

 

 

Everyone knows teachers LOVE to glitter things—–so this week we glittered our shaving cream! We chose a bright pink glitter that was REALLY eye-catching.

Track the movement of objects that are pushed or pulled is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

Our water play basin was a little smaller than the water slide from Fun Day but there was still fun to be had. The students were pretty intrigued watching the spinning water wheel.

The science access point observe and recognize a predictable cause-effect relationship related to a science topic can be addressed here.

 

 

 

 

 


Ms. Maria sure looked like she was having fun eating her Columbian mango dessert so we used Bath and BodyWorks mango scent for both our water play and lotion this week. It was a nice sweet scent that the students really liked.

Recognize one or more external body parts is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

FINE MOTOR GROUP

On Tuesday our students used glitter to decorate some “Dancing Diva” musical notes made from black construction paper using this: music note

We started by letting our students choose which color glitter they wanted to use. They had a choice of green, red, or purple—–with the overwhelming favorite being PURPLE!

The language access point adjust body movement or nonverbal expression with prompting as necessary to communicate wants and needs is addressed here.

 

 

 

 

After squeezing out some glue, the students used a brush to spread it around.

Recognize that pushing and pulling an object makes it move is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

Singing to the tune of that KC and The Sunshine Band song it’s “Time to SHAKE SHAKE SHAKE, SHAKE SHAKE SHAKE, Shake that glitter”!

The math access point solve problems involving small quantities of actions using language, such as enough, too much, or more can be addressed here.

 

 

 

 

 

TA la la DA!

                                                                 So sparkly!

 

 

 

 

 

On Wednesday the students again used glitter but this time they decorated some wooden door hangers. These were left over from another project and we had just enough for this group!

First the students chose their door hanger and then used  brushes to “paint” them with glue.

Recognize that pushing and pulling an object makes it move is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

Next the students identified each glitter color using communication symbols.

Match objects with similar observable properties, such as color is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Then the students used the different colored glitters to decorate their door hangers. Shaking that glitter again 🙂

Recognize a change in an object is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

Ta DA!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                                             Glitterville!!!

 

 

 

 

LANGUAGE GROUP

It is SOOOOO hot here, so our recipe was a cold one that was very appreciated!  This week we made mango frosties.  Here is the recipe we used: Let_s Make a Mango Frosty!

Throughout the group, picture symbols were presented to the students to help them locate the appropriate symbols on their communication boards.  The adults in the room helped model the use of the boards.

We started by measuring out the coconut milk.  We talked about how we needed a measuring cup rather than measuring spoons.  We then added the honey, vanilla, and salt.  Our students were great helpers and poured each ingredient into the food processor.

Recognize when an object is added to or taken away from a situation is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

Since Cara accidentally forgot the lime at home (whoops!), we skipped that part and went onto the frozen mangoes and bananas.   We brought the frozen fruit around and each student touched the bag.  We talked about how COLD the bags were.

Recognize objects or materials as warm or cold is a science access point.

 

 

 

 

 

Once all the ingredients were in the food processor, our students helped turn it on by activating a switch.  It took a little while to get really smooth so each student had a chance to help out.

The math access point solve problems involving small quantities of objects or action using language, such as enough, too much, or more is addressed here.

 

 

 

 

 

When the frosty was ready, we counted out cups for each of our friends.

                                                         We needed 7!

Associate quantities with number names is a math access point.

 

 

 

 

 

Then, our favorite part, we got to eat!

YUM!!!!!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What a great start to the school year!

Join us again next time for more fun and learning——-Group by Group!